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ACCT 175 - Accounting Independent Study

Approved research project or reading program under the direction of accounting instructor. With department approval.

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ACCT 203 - Principles of Accounting I

Briar Cliff University's introduction to the use of accounting in the decision-making process. Course competencies will be developed in the areas of identifying the role of accounting in society, basic accounting and business terminology, accounting standards and generally accepted accounting practices, and analysis, preparation and interpretation of financial statements of business entities.

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ACCT 204 - Principles of Accounting II

This Briar Cliff University course is designed to continue financial statement analysis and introduce the basics of managerial accounting, including, but not limited to, the following: cost behavior, costing methods, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, planning and control and other introductory topics.

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ACCT 275 - Accounting Independent Study

Approved research project or reading program under the direction of accounting instructor. With department approval.

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ACCT 311 - Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)

Theory and practice of individual income tax preparation. This course fulfills the community service component.

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ACCT 316 - Federal Taxation I

Briar Cliff University's introduction to federal tax law as it applies to individuals. Topics covered include the basic tax model, basic tax research and planning, determination of gross income, exclusions, adjustments, deductions, losses, taxable income, depreciation, passive activity losses, alternative minimum tax, tax credits, payment procedures, capital gains and losses, property transaction, nontaxable exchanges, accounting bases, accounting periods and return preparation.

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ACCT 317 - Federal Taxation II

Briar Cliff's introduction to federal tax law as it applies to corporation, partnerships, S-corporations, and trusts and estates. Basics of tax planning, research and tax preparation for some of these entities are also introduced.

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ACCT 323 - Intermediate Accounting I

This course is designed as an intensive study of accounting principles and current methodology; analysis of problems concerning the recording and reporting of accounts; and the accounting process and the interrelationship of balance sheet and income statement accounts.

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ACCT 324 - Intermediate Accounting II

This course focuses on the analysis of problems concerning the recording and reporting of liabilities; the capital structure of corporations; the communication and reporting of financial information; the preparation and interpretation of financial statements; and the reporting of pensions for corporations.

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ACCT 325 - Intermediate Accounting III

This is an advanced focus on the analysis of problems concerning the recording and reporting of liabilities, the capital structure of corporations; the communication and reporting of financial information, the preparation and interpretation of financial statements; and the reporting of pensions for corporations.

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ACCT 340 - Accounting Information Systems

Information, communication and networking techniques applied within the context of transaction cycles and the internal control structure.

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ACCT 350 - Cost Accounting

An advanced study of cost/managerial accounting. This course will build on cost/managerial accounting in the functional areas of operations, control and decision making.

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ACCT 370 - Governmental Accounting

A study of the governmental and nongovernmental nonprofit financial reporting principles. Reporting requirements of nonprofit entities including colleges and universities, hospitals and other nonprofit entities. Comprehensive annual financial report requirements of governmental entities, as well as supplemental information of other nongovernmental nonprofit entities.

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ACCT 375 - Accounting Independent Study

Approved research project or reading program under the direction of accounting instructor. With department approval.

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ACCT 390 - Accounting Internship

To be arranged. Permission of the department is required.

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ACCT 403 - ASC Research

Students will apply accounting, management, finance and statistical theories to various accounting situations. They will also explore the process of the development of accounting standards, including accounting codification.

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ACCT 413 - Advanced Accounting

Study of accounting theory and practice relative to business combination; consolidated financial statements; inter-company transactions; issues relating to subsidiaries and special applications of consolidated procedures; and branch accounting and partnership accounting.

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ACCT 420 - Forensic Accounting

Students will use investigative and analytical skills to resolve financial issues in many varied financial settings.

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ACCT 465 - Auditing

A study of audit concepts and objectives, principles of internal control, audit reports, and procedures.

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ACCT 475 - Accounting Independent Study

Approved research project or reading program under the direction of accounting instructor. With department approval.

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ACCT 490 - Accounting Internship

To be arranged. Permission of the department is required.

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ART 108 - International Art Travel Seminar

This course is an international travel experiential learning tour with an emphasis on Art History. During this short-term study abroad, students and instructor will encounter famous original works of art and explore cities and villages throughout selected regions. Transportation and accommodations will be organized and preparatory seminars and classes will be held in advance of the trip. Specific destinations will change depending on student and faculty interest. Classes meet during second semester with the tour following graduation in May.

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ART 110 - Drawing I

This course focuses on learning to see form through the process of drawing still-life and the human figure. It is open to all students, both to those who have some drawing experience and those without any prior experience. The course assists the student towards improvement of their visual observation skills and provides individualized attention in developing the student's rendering of three dimensional objects in two dimensions. A variety of media is utilized.

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ART 111 - Design

Design is an introductory course in the elements of art and the principles of color and composition. Projects will include 2 and 3-dimensional organization. Studio activity will include a variety of media in the production of assignments. The design projects will progress from basic exercises to complete compositions. This course prepares the foundation for students interested in drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, applied and graphic design.

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ART 112 - Intro to Visual Arts

This course introduces the student to the fundamental principles needed to develop a basic understanding of the creative, structural and expressive dimensions of the visual arts. It is an exploration of the theories, media and historical context that has informed artists.

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ART 115 - Art History: Prehistory to Gothic

A historical survey of Western Art from Prehistory through Gothic. Includes the Ancient World: Prehistory, Egyptian, Ancient Near East, Aegean, Greek, Etruscan and Roman; and The Middle Ages: Early Christian, Byzantine, Early Medieval, Romanesque and Gothic.

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ART 116 - Art History: Renaissance to Modern

A historical survey of Western Art from Renaissance through Modern. Includes The Renaissance through Rococo: Early and High Renaissance, Mannerism, Late Gothic, Baroque and Rococo; and The Modern World: Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism and Twentieth Century.

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ART 117 - Art History: Modern

A historical survey of Modern Art, a time of radical change and innovation. Includes: Early Modernism, Cubism, Expressionism, Futurism, Dadaism, De Stijl, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Post-Painterly Abstraction, Conceptualism, Lyrical Abstraction, Hyper Realism, Neo-Expressionism, Post-Modernism, and Neo-Modernism.

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ART 120 - Drawing II

Drawing II is an advanced course in drawing with emphases on furthering drawing skills and producing creative compositions in various media resulting in finished works. This course relies on critical skill development from Drawing I.

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ART 175 - Independent Art Study

Approved project or program under the direction of art instructor. With department approval.

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ART 217 - Reading Seminar

A seminar course with selected readings in contemporary, avant-garde art and theories, emphasizing major artists and critics. This course prepares the student for critical discussion and research in the studio and the independent reading program. As a forum of concepts and ideas, the student is challenged to consider the purpose and meaning of twentieth century art as they begin to deal with their own art forms and develop their personal philosophy of art.

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ART 225 - Media and Techniques

This course introduces the student to the basic media and methods used in producing art works. It is the philosophy of the department that ideas and needs control the use and selection of media. Traditional media and methods will be introduced as a foundation along with modified and specialized media and techniques for a diverse overview. This course should be taken in conjunction with Art 250.

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ART 230 - Pottery I

An introduction to the art of wheel-thrown pottery. Students will have direct studio experience in mixing and wedging clay, preparing and applying glazes, working at the wheel, and participating in the firing of the pottery. The department uses electric and gas kilns with instruction in the various clay bodies and glazes. During the course the student is introduced to a diversity of examples in ceramic pottery from both eastern and western cultures.

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ART 231 - Pottery II

This pottery course is an advance of Art 230 Pottery I. Students in this course will advance beyond the introductory methods and techniques of Pottery I and strive to achieve a higher level of technique and a more refined and aesthetic form.

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ART 235 - Encounter with Art I

In this course students will travel to regional galleries and museums. The focus is on direct encounter with the form, medium, technique and installation of original works of art. This experience will enhance the student's artistic direction, appreciation and theory of art.

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ART 250 - Studio I

Studio I is the first studio course designed to pursue, develop and investigate possibilities that are related to the student's core sensibility and aesthetic and conceptual direction. The creative process in Studio I takes the student through numerous and varied studies and culminates in the first finished work. Selection within a variety of mediums such as drawing, painting, sculpture and mixed media, as investigated in Art 225, gives the student the opportunity to experience multiple media while following their artistic interest.

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ART 260 - Studio II

Studio II is a continuation of ART 250 with an emphasis on producing finished works. This process of completing works promotes a creative evolution of ideas and forms. Throughout the course the student may change and modify media as the works develop. Studio production and criticism foster the artistic development of the student. Discussion and research of artists, art works, media, techniques, aesthetics and theory will be included in the studio experience.

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ART 275 - Independent Art Study II

Approved project or program under the direction of art instructor. With department approval.

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ART 332 - Special Methods of Teaching Elementary Art

A survey of the models and strategies necessary to build a K-6 art education program. Students will be introduced to educational strategies used in successful art programs as well as the DBAE (Discipline Based Art Education) of instruction. Study of curriculum and pedagogy.

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ART 345 - Encounter With Art II

Advanced encounter with works of art in galleries, museums and online, with the purpose of studying art works in relationship to the student's artwork.

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ART 350 - Studio III

Studio III is a continuation of ART 260 with a continuing emphasis on producing finished works. Discussion and research of artists, art works, media, techniques, aesthetics and theory will be included in this studio experience.

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ART 360 - Studio IV

Studio IV continues the emphasis on finished works. At this stage of development, the student accepts more responsibility for the direction of their work, the technical application of media, and the researching of related artists and art forms. Media and methods are open to the student as their work progresses. Discussion and research of artists, art works, media, techniques, aesthetics and theory will be included in the studio experience. Studio discussion and criticism remains a vital part of the process in the production of the art work.

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ART 375 - Independent Art Study III

Approved project or program under the direction of art instructor. With department approval.

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ART 380 - Art Internship

To be arranged. Permission of the department is required.

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ART 390 - Art Internship II

To be arranged. Permission of the department is required.

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ART 425 - Senior Seminar

Students will select and collectively explore topics on contemporary issues in art. Discussions will emphasize the complex nature of the business of art.

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ART 440 - Special Methods of Teaching Secondary Art

Survey of the art program on the junior and senior high levels. Study of the art needs of the secondary student, classroom management and teaching procedures. Involvement with 2-D and 3-D techniques and media applicable to this level. Prerequisite: Education majors and declared art majors

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ART 450 - Studio V

Studio V is a level of studio production which recognizes the capability of the student to be self-directed, and encourages the student to that end. The student may choose a critique of the work after it is completed or have an interactive dialogue during the development of the work. Discussion and research of artists, art works, media, techniques, aesthetics and theory will be included in the studio experience. This level focuses on advanced work, integration of theory and personal form, and an ability to function independently.

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ART 460 - Studio VI, Thesis

This course is a senior capstone course in which a student produces a defining work and writes a position paper on that work. Student work will be independently produced with formal and conceptual significance and technical control. The student will receive post-production criticism. The student will install a cohesive exhibition of their works, including the Thesis work, and present a paper and images of their work to the department. The student will develop an electronic presentation of the evolution of western art using images from prehistory - modernism, and include a selection of works supporting the student's core sensibility.

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ART 475 - Independent Art Study IV

Approved project or program under the direction of art instructor. With department approval.

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BCMB 10IS - Molecular and Genetic Techniques I

BCMB 20IS - Molecular and Genetic Techniques II

BCMB 401 - Biochemistry (Molecular Biology) Research Project I

This course will be comprised of two components. First, the student will be introduced to literature in the field, particularly primary research literature. Secondly, the student will develop a research proposal and determine a feasible research project with the instructor. Initial experimentation will be undertaken.

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BCMB 402 - Biochemistry (Molecular Biology) Research Project II

A continuation of BCMB 401, this course focuses on laboratory experimentation in a research project and the challenges it can present.

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BCMB 403 - Biochemistry (Molecular Biology) Research Project III

A continuation of BCMB 402, this provides an opportunity for the final steps in the research project. Additional experiments may be conducted to bring that facet of the project to a conclusion. The results of the research are then incorporated into a report (paper) suitable for either presentation in a public forum or publication in a journal. In the former situation, the student will present the work at a scientific meeting, preferably at the national or regional level.

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BIOL 102 - Human Biology

An introduction to human structure and function. Topics include the scientific method, cell structure and function, and human inheritance, as well as other selected systems. Three lectures.

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BIOL 102L - Human Biology Laboratory

An optional laboratory for those students desiring some practical exercises dealing with the topics in lecture. One laboratory per week.

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BIOL 106 - Biology of Women

This course is designed for non-biology majors to fulfill the physical and life sciences foundation. It is an introduction to the unique biology of women and the changes that occur throughout the lifespan of women.

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BIOL 151 - General Biology I

This course is an introduction to cellular biology. Topics covered include the scientific method, structure and function of cell, genetics and molecules of life. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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BIOL 152 - General Biology II

This course in an introduction to organismal biology. Topics covered include the scientific method, ecology, evolution and the diversity of life forms. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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BIOL 175 - Independent Biology Study

Open to juniors and seniors who wish to engage in directed research in a selected area. Permission of the advisor is required.

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BIOL 212 - General Botany

A survey course of organisms traditionally treated as plants. Topics will also include a review of structure and function of vascular plants, physiological processes characterized by plants, and the importance of plants in everyday life. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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BIOL 213 - Invertebrate Zoology

A survey of representative phyla of the invertebrates, organisms which consist of at least 90 percent of the earth's fauna. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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BIOL 221 - Human Anatomy

A study of the structure of the human body at the four structural levels (cells, tissues, organs and systems) and the relationship of its parts. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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BIOL 222 - Human Physiology

A study of the functions of the cells and organ systems of the human body. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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BIOL 22IS - Scientific Writing and Research

This course examines the various components of scientific primary sources as well as how each section is written. Students will demonstrate the use of basic computer skills: database search strategies, spreadsheets, presentation software, word processing and use of e-mail. Students will demonstrate scientific analytical and communication skills through writing assignments and an oral presentation.

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BIOL 237 - General Ecology

A study of the interrelationships of organisms to their environment and each other at the population, community and ecosystem levels reinforced with a survey of North American biomes. Field observations and lab exercises in natural habitats. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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BIOL 239 - Intro to Microbiology

An introduction to the world of microorganisms, with special emphasis on their medical importance. Aseptic technique is stressed in the laboratory. Three lectures, two labs per week. Prerequisite: eight hours of biology and/or chemistry or permission of the instructor. Not open to students having credit for BIOL 339.

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BIOL 240 - Nutrition

A survey of the principles of nutrition and their application to normal conditions of growth and development. Includes food groups, nutrient requirements, energy metabolism, composition and safety of foods, nutritional needs for the different life stages, and application of nutrition to health care and sports.

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BIOL 275 - Independent Biology Study II

Open to juniors and seniors who wish to engage in directed research in a selected area. Permission of the advisor is required.

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BIOL 280 - Extended Field Trip

The Extended Field Trip typically provides an opportunity during a 10-14 day trip to study the major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of a North American ecoregion.

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BIOL 300 - Entomology

This course is an introduction to the biology, ecology and identification of insects. Lecture topics will also include adaptations, evolution, classification and medical applications of insects. Laboratory and field activities include dissection, sampling, specimen preparation and identification. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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BIOL 320 - Comparative Vertebrate Zoology

A comparative study of the anatomy and physiology of the chordate phylum with emphasis on the phylogeny and classification of major vertebrate taxa.

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BIOL 339 - Principles of Microbiology

An in-depth study of microorganisms, including ultra structure, growth characteristics, metabolism and genetics.

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BIOL 340 - Pathophysiology

An introduction to the biochemical, cellular, physiologic and biologic manifestations of disease. Includes alterations in normal function, disruptions in homeostatic mechanisms and adaptations of body systems to disease processes.

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BIOL 357 - Genetics

The scientific study of heredity including transmission genetics, cytogenetics and molecular genetics (DNA structure and function). Four lectures.

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BIOL 375 - Independent Biology Study III

Open to juniors and seniors who wish to engage in directed research in a selected area. Permission of the advisor is required.

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BIOL 400 - Immunology

A comprehensive study of immunology designed especially for students in the medical laboratory science program and other health-related areas. Topics discussed: chemical properties of antibodies, antigen recognition, immune response, techniques of immunoassay and diseases with immunological bases.

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BIOL 412 - Field Botany

An introduction to the classification, nomenclature and identification of vascular plants. Taxonomic and biogeographical relationships of families, genera and species will be discussed. The laboratory is devoted to an examination of the spring flora by emphasizing the identification and recognition of ferns, trees, shrubs and herbs. Proper collection and herbarium techniques will be practiced as students prepare specimens for a required plant collection.

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BIOL 420 - Cell and Molecular Biology

Through lecture and laboratory activities this course investigates the structure and function of all major eukaryotic organelles and the techniques used in cell biology.

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BIOL 420L - Cellular and Molecular Biology Lab

This is a three-hour weekly laboratory class to be taken in correspondence with BIOL 420, a course that investigates the structure and function of all major eukaryotic organelles and the techniques used in cell bi

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BIOL 440 - Special Methods of Teaching Secondary School Biology

A survey of biological science curricula, presentation of lecture content and structuring of laboratories.

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BIOL 475 - Independent Biology Study IV

Open to juniors and seniors who wish to engage in directed research in a selected area. Permission of the advisor is required.

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BIOL 550 - Advanced Human Pathophysiology

Focuses on cellular physiological and pathophysiological processes through the lifespan, in order to provide a foundation for wholistic clinical assessment, decision-making, and clinical management. Emphasis is on commonly found altered health states based on current epidemiological trends. Integration of current research from nursing and other disciplines is used to explore the pathophysiological processes, the compensatory mechanisms, and the rationales for clinical interventions. The advanced practice clinician will be able to utilize this knowledge as a basis for interpreting changes in normal physiologic function, and in prescribing appropriate treatment modalities.

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BIOL 58IS - Senior Seminar

Contemporary biological issues will be the focus of this capstone course required of all senior biology majors. The discussion format will require students to integrate prior knowledge and experiences. All students will take a standardized exam at the end of the course. Open only to seniors.

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BiOL 623 - Advanced Pathophysiology

This course focuses on cellular physiologic and pathophysiologic processes through the lifespan, in order to provide a foundation for holistic clinical assessment, decision-making, and clinical management

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BUAD 150 - Entrepreneurship

An overview of issues surrounding the start-up of a business. Topics included are the characteristics of an entrepreneur, entrepreneurial opportunities, resources available for small businesses and business plans. Traditional business opportunities such as franchising will be examined as well as new ventures on the Internet.

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BUAD 175 - Independent Business Administration Study

Readings, research or creative work on a problem related to major field. With departmental approval

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BUAD 223 - Legal Environment of Business

Major areas to be covered include the nature of and origins of law; ethics and social responsibility of business entities; our judicial system; the development of our common law system; the differences between the various areas of the law; elements necessary to establish and give rise to an intentional tort and negligence; the elements necessary to establish a contract; and the differences between business entities such as a sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation.

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BUAD 224 - Business Law II

Principles of law that determine the rights and obligations of persons participating in business transactions. Major topics include sales, commercial paper, secured transactions, partnerships, corporations, real property and estates.

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BUAD 225 - Principles of Management

A study of the concepts, principles and philosophy of management. The four functions of management—planning, organizing, leading and controlling - are examined with respect to various management styles.

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BUAD 275 - Independent Business Administration Study II

Readings, research or creative work on a problem related to major field. With departmental approval

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BUAD 276 - E-Business

This course examines the influence of the Internet on business. E-commerce (buying and selling electronically), providing services to customers, internal collaboration and cooperation with business partners are researched and discussed. This class will take a managerial approach rather than a technical one.

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BUAD 301 - Principles of Marketing

Study of the concepts and problems concerned with the flow of goods and services to the consumer. An analysis will be made of the following: Marketing functions, wholesale and retail institutions, and internal and external factors affecting activities.

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BUAD 305 - Consumer Behavior

The major objective of this course is to find out why people buy what they buy, when they buy and where they buy. Behavioral and social influences on the buying process will also be examined. This information is then used to more effectively plan marketing programs.

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BUAD 310 - Business Research

A study of the application of qualitative and quantitative research methods to business decision-making. Students will define the research problem, design a research project, and conduct, analyze, organize and present data in both oral and written forms.

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BUAD 330 - Principles of Corporate Finance

Enables the student to gain a basic understanding of the financial management function of a business enterprise. Considers the relationship among business disciplines: tax accounting, finance and economics. Topics covered: math of finance, technique of financial analysis, impact of tax on financial decision, working capital management, sources and forms of intermediate and long-term financing, cost of capital structure, and the integrated financial policy.

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BUAD 345 - Advertising

A survey of advertising objectives of different levels of business organization. The course deals with campaigns, techniques and various media available to firms and industry.

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BUAD 350 - Production and Operations Management

This course deals with the design, operation and improvement of the production systems that create the firm's primary products or services. Production is the creation of goods and services. Operations management is the set of activities that create goods and services through the transformation of inputs and outputs.

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BUAD 360 - Marketing Research

This course examines the marketing research process from problem identification to presentation of research results. It gives the student a hands-on approach for solving marketing problems and taking advantage of marketing opportunities.

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BUAD 375 - Independent Business Administration Study III

Readings, research or creative work on a problem related to major field. With departmental approval

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BUAD 383 - Money and Banking

A study of operations, mechanics and structure of the financial system in the United States, emphasizing its institutions, markets and instruments. Special attention is given to the Federal Reserve System, monetary policy's effect on the economy and on financial institutions.

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BUAD 385 - Global Management

This course studies how businesses plan, develop, market and distribute products/services on a global scale. Special emphasis is placed on how businesses adapt to different cultural, political and economic environments.

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BUAD 390 - Business Internship

To be arranged. With departmental approval

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BUAD 409 - Process Leadership

Development of project leadership with emphasis on team building leadership, problem solving, negotiation, entrepreneurship and resource planning. Case studies, class discussion, written assignments and oral presentations are utilized in instructional delivery.

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BUAD 410 - Marketing Management

This is a capstone course for a marketing student. Advanced marketing strategies and tactics are studied and then applied in a case study approach. Prerequisite: Three marketing courses.

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BUAD 411 - Methods of Improvement

This course is the study and analysis of productive and non-productive work elements for the purpose of productivity improvements and establishing time standards. Topics covered include: lean manufacturing overview, introduction to six sigma, 5S overview, metrics for lean, identifying problems, understanding cause and effects and process flow charting.

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BUAD 414 - Project Management

Project Management's primary goal is to manage projects so that they are completed on time, within budget, and in accordance with contract documents. THis course develops and discusses techniques that will assist students in successful project management practices. STudents will plan, produce, execute and appraise a project plan.

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BUAD 415 - Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management

This course provides a logical development of practical investment principles and security analysis. The areas covered will include operations of security markets, sources of investment information, security evaluation and portfolio management.

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BUAD 429 - Strategic Management

This course is designed for the student to incorporate the business-related knowledge of previous study into decision-making analysis. Through case studies and simulation games the methodology of problem evaluation and the decision-making process is examined.

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BUAD 475 - Independent Business Administration Study IV

Readings, research or creative work on a problem related to major field. With departmental approval

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BUAD 482 - Production & Inventory Management

Study and analysis of systems and methods for planning and control of manufacturing resources. Main topics include master planning, inventory management, material and capacity requirements planning, production activity control and "Just-in-Time."

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BUAD 490 - Business Internship II

To be arranged. With departmental approval

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BUAD 70 IR - Briar Cliff Enactus

Enactus, formerly Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) strives to fulfill the goals of market economics, entrepreneurship, personal finance skills and business ethics to better themselves, their communities and their countries. Every year, Enactus competitions are held around the world to bring together students and leaders to honor these extraordinary projects. Briar Cliff’s award-winning Enactus team was founded in 2002.

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BUAD 500 - Introduction to Graduate Studies

The purpose of this course is to introduce beginning MBA students to the content and relational knowledge expected of a successful graduate student and to introduce the student to primary and secondary materials available through Briar Cliff University.

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CHEM 04 IS - Lab Instructor I

The experience includes training of the student in the role as a laboratory instructor in basic chemistry as well as performance by the student in the laboratory.

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BUAD 505 - Managerial Corporate Finance

Corporate finance is central to the operation of every organization. This course explores the theoretical aspects of corporate finance.

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CHEM 05 IS - Chemistry Research I

Original scientific research performed by the undergraduate under the mentorship of a faculty member.

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BUAD 511 - Managerial Economics

Managerial Economics is the application of economic theory and methodology to managerial decision making problems within various organizational settings such as a firm or a government agency.

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CHEM 109 - Chemistry for the Health Sciences I

A study of the principles of general chemistry with emphasis on those topics of interest to students of the health sciences. The course includes a lab component with experiments that complement topics covered in lecture. This course is not a preparation for higher level courses in chemistry, other than CHEM 110.

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BUAD 512 - Business Ethics

This course is designed to provide an analysis and examination of significant contemporary ethical issues and challenges existing throughout the professional business arena.

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CHEM 110 - Chemistry for the Health Sciences II

A study of the basic principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry, including metabolism. The course includes a lab component with experiments that complement topics covered in lecture. This course is not a preparation for higher level courses in chemistry.

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BUAD 535 - Business Analytics

To achieve the learning goals, this class focuses on the primary element of business intelligence or decision support systems: database platforms that store data.

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CHEM 111 - Principles of Chemistry I

A presentation of the basic principles of chemistry including stoichiometry, thermochemistry, atomic and molecular properties, and properties of gases, liquids and solids.

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BUAD 536 - Leadership and Team Development

This course will present the basic principles of building and sustaining teams in organizations including team dynamics and process improvement.

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CHEM 111L - Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I

An introduction to experimental chemical methods of synthesis and characterization by quantitative and qualitative procedures. Experiments will include investigations of stoichiometry, gas properties and calorimetry.

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BUAD 558 - Applied Service Learning

At Briar Cliff University, service-learning is embedded in existing courses throughout our degree programs and is seen as a valuable learning activity, bringing to life the tradition of Catholic social thought and Spiritan charism.

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CHEM 112 - Principles of Chemistry II

A utilization of the basic principles of chemistry learned in CHEM 111 in complex chemical systems. Included are solution properties, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium and descriptive inorganic chemistry.

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BUAD 568 - Sustainable Management

Sustainability is not just an obligation, a set of strategies or a niche market to explore, but a critical shift in mindset of how businesses function. Sustainable Management examines business strategies in response to environmental and social challenges.

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CHEM 112L - Principles of Chemistry Laboratory II

An introduction of experimental chemical methods of synthesis and characterization by quantitative and qualitative procedures. Experiments will include investigations of acids and bases, redox reactions, equilibrium and kinetics.

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BUAD 571 - Marketing Management

Marketing Management is the art and science of choosing target markets and getting, keeping, and growing customers through creating, delivering, and communicating superior customer value.

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CHEM 13 IS - Chemistry Research II

A continuation of CHEM 05 IS, this experience will include an organization of the results into a coherent unit, suitable for use in the publication of a paper on the subject.

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BUAD 605 - Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance

This course is a link between fundamental corporate finance and the more specialized issues in corporate finance.

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CHEM 235 - Quantitative Analysis

This integrated lecture and laboratory course in analytical chemistry develops the theory and experimental procedures necessary to determine exact amounts of analytes present in commonly occurring situations.

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BUAD 613 - Production and Operations Management

This course deals with the design, operation and improvement of the production systems that create the firm's primary products or services. Production is the creation of goods and services. Operations management is the set of activities that create goods and services through the transformation of inputs and outputs.

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CHEM 29 IS - Chemical Materials Preparation

This course covers training in the aspects, including safety, of preparing chemicals for use in a lab. Students will then prepare actual labs.

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BUAD 615 - Financial Analysis

A study of the tools and techniques of financial valuation using cash flow information and present valueanalysis.

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CHEM 301 - Instrumental Analysis

An integrated lecture and laboratory experience, this course will focus on the use of modern instrumentation for chemical analysis. The theory and practice of common modes of chemical separations are examined along with various forms of spectroscopy culminating in an integrated hands-on study using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

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BUAD 623 - Business and the Legal Environment

This course is a study of the legal environment of business including elements of tort and contract law, employment law and discrimination, business organizations and the basics of the legal system.

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CHEM 337 - Organic Chemistry I

An examination of the structures, properties and reactions of aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols and ethers. General reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry are also discussed.

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CHEM 337L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

Experimental work involving the synthesis, separation and identification of organic compounds, including the use of gas-liquid chromatography.

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CHEM 338 - Organic Chemistry II

An examination of the structures, properties and reactions of aromatic compounds and organic compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur. Biological applications and multistep synthesis are also studied.

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CHEM 338L - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

A continuation of CHEM 337L, spectrophotometric methods are included.

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CHEM 339 - Inorganic Chemistry

A study of inorganic systems including atomic structure, bonding theories, acid-base phenomena, transition-metal chemistry, periodicity and solvent systems.

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CHEM 35 IS - Dissemination of Results

Students present the results of research, either their original work or a review paper, in a public forum.

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CHEM 36 IS - Academic Chemistry Project

Students will gather information from a variety of resources on a current topic in chemistry and write a paper using this information.

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CHEM 440 - Special Methods of Teaching Chemistry

A study of the methods, tools, and techniques used in teaching high school chemistry. With departmental approval

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CHEM 442 - Biochemistry I

A study of the molecules found in living organisms, emphasizing the relationship of their structure to their function. Also examined are the methods used to separate and characterize these molecules.

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CHEM 442L - Biochemistry I Laboratory

Experimental treatment of topics covered in CHEM 442.

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CHEM 443 - Biochemistry II

A study of the major metabolic pathways in the body with emphasis on the regulation of such pathways and the relationship among various pathways. Also explored are some of the practical applications of biochemical studies in the treatment and diagnosis of bodily dysfunction.

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CHEM 445 - Physical Chemistry I

A study of the theoretical treatment of the physical processes which govern chemical behavior. Topics include thermodynamics and equilibrium.

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CHEM 445L - Physical Chemistry Laboratory I

CHEM 445L Physical Chemistry Laboratory I 1 sem. hr. Experimental treatment of those topics which are covered in CHEM 445.

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CHEM 446 - Physical Chemistry II

A continuation of CHEM 445 with expansion of topics to include kinetics, quantum mechanics and spectroscopy.

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CHEM 446L - Physical Chemistry Laboratory II

Experimental treatment of those topics covered in CHEM 446.

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CJUS 100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice

Introduction to Criminal Justice is an overview of the criminal justice system and the sub-systems in the United States.

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CJUS 246 - Introduction to Criminology

Introduction to Criminology presents the major biological, psychological, and sociological theories of criminal behavior, and provides a descriptive overview of crime in the United States. Topics include crime rate statistics, historical trends in crime and crime rates, and characteristics of both offenders and victims.

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CJUS 250 - Modern Police Theory and Practice

Modern Police Theory and Practice is an overview and analysis of the American system of law enforcement, examining the origins, development, roles, functions, and operations of policing in a modern democratic society.

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CJUS 251 - Courts and the Criminal Justice Process

Courts and the Criminal Justice Process provides an in-depth exploration of the criminal adjudication process in the U.S.

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CJUS 350 - Issues in Policing

Issues in Policing is an overview of the role of policing in the criminal justice system, with emphasis on community/police collaboration and policing as problem solving. This course includes the historical context and current status of police, policing strategies, police culture, restorative justice strategies, and contemporary challenges in police work.

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CJUS 352 - Issues in Corrections

Issues in Corrections examines a continuum of sanctions ranging from probation to institutional confinement.

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CJUS 355 - Criminal Investigation Techniques

Criminal Investigation Techniques provides a brief overview of scientific crime detection and more detailed discussion of techniques for case management and documentation, the concept of proof, the impact of emergent technology on the investigative process, interacting with victims and witnesses, and interviewing suspects.

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CJUS 365 - Juvenile Justice

Juvenile Justice explores the distinct system that handles juvenile justice in our society, including its history and underlying philosophies.

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CJUS 442 - Advance Research Methods

CJUS 443 - Advanced Statistical Analysis

Advanced Statistical Analysis prepares students to use original and/or secondary data, various statistical techniques, and computer software (SPSS) to conduct research projects and publicly present statistical results.

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CJUS 447 - Advanced Criminology

Advanced Criminology offers an extensive examination of the theoretical explanations of deviance and their intersection with crime control policies. The course emphasizes theory development, integration and evaluation, and requires extensive reading and writing.

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CJUS 460 - The Constitution and Criminal Justice

The Constitution and Criminal Justice examines the criminal procedural foundations established by the fourth, fifth, sixth, and eighth amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

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CJUS 465 - Policy Analysis

Policy Analysis provides an in-depth examination of criminal justice policies, their histories, contemporary political influences, and practical consequences.

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CJUS 470 - Ethics in the Criminal Justice System

Ethics in the Criminal Justice System is an in depth analysis of theories and practices in areas of legality, morality, values and ethics.

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CJUS 480 - Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

Comparative Criminal Justice Systems examines issues related to criminal justice systems throughout the world.

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CJUS 490 - Criminal Justice Internship

A supervised experiential learning opportunity in a criminal justice setting; it requires a minimum of 150 hours of work for three credits and 200 hours for four credits, maintaining a descriptive log and a reflective journal, and periodic meetings with the on- and off-campus supervisors. Permission of the program director is required.

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CORE 100 - Franciscan Life

CORE 100 introduces incoming students to the cultural and historical foundations of Briar Cliff University through an exploration of the Franciscan tradition. The course will also serve to familiarize students with the academic infrastructure of the University and to acculturate them to the expectations, skills, and demands of life as a university student.

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CORE 101 - Franciscan Missions of Southern California

CORE 101 introduces incoming students to the cultural and historical foundations of Briar Cliff University through an exploration of the Franciscan tradition. The course will also incorporates a trip to explore the Franciscan Missions of Southern California. Separate course fee applies.

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CORE 110 - Franciscan Life Online

CORE 110 introduces incoming students to the cultural and historical foundations of Briar Cliff University through an exploration of the Franciscan tradition. This course is very similar to CORE 100, but is held online and does not include some of the experiential learning components of CORE 100. Available only to students transferring in with 30 credits or more.

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CSCI 019M - Electronic Spreadsheet

This hands-on class will cover the use of an electronic spreadsheet for doing repetitive calculations, creating charts, and summarizing and manipulating large sets of data. This class meets the spreadsheet requirements of the Information Technology competency for general education.

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CSCI 100 - Introduction to Computers

An introduction to common computer applications. All sessions will be held in one of the university's computer labs. Students will become proficient with Windows, Word for Windows (word processor), Excel for Windows (spreadsheet), and use of the Internet.

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CSCI 201 - Computer Programming I

An introduction to problem solving and structured programming using C# and XNA. Students will learn the basic concepts of programming by designing game programs for the Xbox. Topics covered include basic data types, control structures and subprograms. Students will learn how to design, code, debug, document, and execute programs using techniques of good programming style. Lab included.

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CSCI 202 - Computer Programming II

A continuation of CSCI 201 with C# and XNA. Topics to be covered include arrays, structures, strings, files, classes, and objects. Students will be expected to write and run a number of larger programs. Lab included.

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CSCI 280 - Computer Organization

An introduction to computer hardware and software. Topics covered include basic hardware components of computer systems, machine and assembly language, data representation, mass storage devices, input and output devices. Lab included. Prer

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CSCI 325 - Data Structures and Algorithms

Students will study the construction, manipulation, use and efficiency of complex data structures and algorithms using the Java programming language.

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CSCI 330 - Programming Language Concepts

Concepts and history of high-level programming languages. Topics covered include syntax, semantics, data types, expressions, control structures, program interpretation and non- procedural programming paradigms.

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CSCI 345 - Database Management

A study of database concepts and database management systems. Topics covered include database design, relational models, normalization and queries. Hands-on experience with database management system is provided.

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CSCI 360 - Networking/Communications

Network design and management and implementation of local area networks.

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CSCI 375 - Independent Computer Science Study

With departmental approval

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CSCI 380 - Operating Systems

Students will study concepts including memory management, I/O control, and concurrency. Hands-on experience with an actual operating system will be provided.

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CSCI 390 - Computer Science Internship

On-the-job experience at a local business.

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CSCI 425 - Internet Programming

This class is an introduction to writing programs for Web pages. Students will learn to create a database-driven interactive web site. This is a hands-on project-oriented class and each student will write a number of programs.

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CSCI 475 - Independent Computer Science Study II

With department approval.

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CSCI 490 - Computer Science Internship II

On-the-job experience at a local business.

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CSCI IS - Independent Computer Science Research

Independent research on an advanced topic in computer science. Required of all junior and senior computer science majors.

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ECON 175 - Independent Economics Study

Reading, research or creative work on a problem related to economics. Permission of the department is required. With departmental approval

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ECON 210 - Principles of Microeconomics

Introduction to basic economic theory, with emphasis placed on decision making by individual units such as households, firms, or industries and with individual markets for final goods and resources. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor

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ECON 211 - Principles of Macroeconomics

Introduction to basic economic theory, with emphasis on the economy as a whole. An examination of major aggregates such as households, businesses, and government sectors and measures of the total economy.

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ECON 275 - Independent Economics Study II

Reading, research or creative work on a problem related to economics. Permission of the department is required. With departmental approval

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ECON 375 - Independent Economic Study III

Reading, research or creative work on a problem related to economics. Permission of the department is required. With departmental approval

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ECON 475 - Independent Economics Study IV

Reading, research or creative work on a problem related to economics. Permission of the department is required. With departmental approval

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EDEL 216 - Teaching Elementary Science

The principles and methods of teaching elementary science will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on teaching science through discovery, inquiry and hands-on activities.

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EDEL 241 - Children's Literature

The study of literature, encompassing PK-8, either expressly written for children or given to children, including folklore, poetry, fantasy, modern realistic fiction, biography, historical fiction, multicultural and informational books. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or permission of instructor

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EDEL 335 - Teaching Elementary Mathematics

Principles and methods for teaching elementary mathematics will be emphasized in the course. Practical application of concepts through the use of manipulatives and interdisciplinary approaches are included in this course.

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EDEL 342 - Teaching Elementary Social Studies

The principles and methods of teaching elementary social studies will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on: designing instruction that incorporates research-based strategies; differentiation of instruction based on students' needs; and supporting instruction through literature, writing, and a variety of resources, including technology.

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EDEL 461 - Teaching Elementary Language Arts

This is an introductory course which emphasizes the principles and methodology of teaching language arts skills (grammar, spelling, listening, thinking, speaking and writing).

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EDEL 464 - Reading Assessment, Diagnosis and Evaluation

This course emphasizes the teaching of language development, corrective and remedial reading problems and strategies. Informal and formal assessment measures are studied.

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EDEL 465 - Reading Practicum

This course has students apply the knowledge and skills from EDEL 464. Students will study the causes of reading difficulties, instruction in the administration and interpretation of tests, and use case histories in the analysis of data. Small group and individual student diagnosis and remediation are employed through a 30 hr. practicum. Prerequisite: taken concurrently with EDEL 464

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EDEL 466 - Elementary Reading and Content Area Instruction

This course emphasizes research-based reading, writing, vocabulary and assessment strategies and practices for teaching reading effectively in the elementary classroom. Particular emphasis will also be given to text structure, vocabulary and comprehension for teaching reading in content areas.

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EDMI 421 - Teaching in Middle School

The structure and curriculum of the middle school are studied in relationship to educational objectives and research in human development. Careful analysis will be made of research- based models for curriculum design and instruction in the middle school, specifically grades 5-8. Interdisciplinary teaming, advisories, and other strategies supporting the rationale of the middle school concept will be addressed.

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EDMI 422 - Middle School Literacy

This course prepares middle school teachers in the use of literacy strategies (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) for students in grades 5-8 and how to infuse these strategies throughout the curriculum.

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EDSE 07 IR - Content Area Reading

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge of reading competencies which middle and secondary students need when reading in the content area.

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EDUC 03 IS - Introduction to Education Computer/Media Technology

This is an introduction to using computers and information technology in education. The various uses of computers and technology in education are examined with an emphasis on creating all types of digital media: text, images, audio, and video. The student will become familiar with common productivity tools, and will identify useful education-related Internet resources. The student will look at how information technology is being used in today's classrooms.

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EDUC 14 IS - Electronic Portfolio

This course prepares education majors in how to create the electronic portfolio used to demonstrate the candidate's competency in meeting each of the standards of the Teacher Preparation Program. This course must be taken in conjunction with student teaching.

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EDUC 210 - Educational Foundations

This course provides an orientation to the teaching profession through historical and philosophical discussions, professional readings, presentations, guest speakers, and practicums at the elementary, middle and high school levels. Discussion topics include the structure of American education, school structure and governance, philosophies of education, and professional ethics and legal responsibilities. Prerequisite for all education courses.

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EDUC 250 - Management and Instruction

An examination of and experimentation with various processes and strategies in classroom management and arrangement available to elementary and secondary classroom teachers is presented. Activities will include planning and organization of lessons, and approaches to discipline. EDUC 01 IR is taken concurrently with EDUC 250.

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EDUC 270 - Exceptional Learners

The intent of the course is to examine education of persons with learning disabilities, mental retardation, emotional and behavioral disorders, physical disabilities, sensory impairments, other health impairments, and gifted and talented children. The special traits of each group will be studied as well as the relationships of their traits and abilities to their education, social and psychological needs. Stress will be placed on practical applications of theory (e.g. remediation techniques, etc.) as well as the theories regarding etiological factors.

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EDUC 300 - Foundations of Catholic Schools in America

Historical overview of the development of Catholic schools in America; exploration of the Catholic school identity, legislation and judicial issues affecting Catholic schools. This course may be substituted for EDUC 05 IR. Taken after the completion of 60 hours.

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EDUC 318 - Educational Psychology

Study of psychological principles applicable to the learning process; theories of learning, and research pertinent to teaching and learning. EDUC 02IR is taken concurrently with EDUC 318.

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EDUC 330 - Educational Measurement and Evaluation

Emphasis upon the nature of standardized tests and the construction of classroom evaluative devices; introduction of elementary statistics; test interpretation; discussion of current trends and needs in evaluation.

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EDUC 400 - Ministry of Catholic School Teaching

Considers the concepts of the call, covenant and mission of the Catholic school teacher; reviews sources of spiritual formation, faith community development, and the governance and structure of the diocesan school system. This course may be substituted for EDUC 06 IR. Taken after the completion of 60 semester hours.

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EDUC 410 - Student Teaching in the Elementary School

Scope and general characteristics of the elementary school, including teacher characteristics, evaluation; classroom management and control; current trends and issues in teaching and professional growth. Directed observations, participation and teaching under the supervision and guidance of selected classroom teachers and the college supervisor of student teaching. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Preparation Program and completion of the professional methods sequence

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EDUC 412 - Student Teaching K-12

Observation and participation in teaching art, vocal music or physical education in both elementary and secondary schools. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Preparation Program and completion of the professional methods courses

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EDUC 415 - Student Teaching in the Secondary School

Observation and participation in teaching and other professional activities related to the work of the secondary school teacher; planning periods and conferences with the supervising teacher and the college supervisor(s) of student teaching. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Teacher Preparation Program and completion of the professional methods course

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EDUC 450 - Human Relations

Designed to develop professional human relation skills for teaching in an aspiring pluralistic society through both theoretical and experiential work. Special emphasis placed on understanding social, cultural, and interpersonal dimensions of the interaction among subgroups. Approximately half of the course time is spent in off-campus experiences.

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EDUC 475 - Independent Educational Study

Open to students who wish to engage in directed research in a selected area. Permission of the departmental chairperson is required. Prerequisite: EDUC 210 With departmental approval

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EDUC 500 - Research for School Leaders

The introductory course for the MAE program lays a foundation of exploring research from the qualitative, quantitative, and action research traditions. Through the lens of teacher leadership, Students will connect theory to practice as knowledgeable and responsible consumers of research and will develop their capacity to meet challenges in the increasingly complex world of schooling.

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EDUC 501 - Learning and Learners

Distinguishing the impact of individual needs and interests associated with a broad spectrum of exceptionalities and reflecting on the impact of responsive instruction in a democratic learning environment enables master teachers to foster the holistic development of all learners. Students will examine principles of learner development across cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical domains. Historical and current issues of access and equity will be considered in the context of a global society.

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EDUC 502 - Literacy, STEAM, and Turn-Around Schools

In 2009, the United States Department of Education changed Title I funding by requiring districts and states to choose among four options: restart, shut down, transformation, or turn-around. Schools that chose the turn-around method are becoming models of 21st Century educational reform through an integration of Literacy and Science-Technology-Engineering-Arts-Mathematics (STEAM). As teacher leaders, students will study the process of effective and sustainable change in turnaround schools.

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EDUC 503 - Systems Change in Organizations

Educational research has recognized that schools are complex organizational systems. Understanding how systems operate as well as the roles and responsibilities of teacher leaders are central to shaping and influencing change. Students will study the contexts, structures, and processes of school organizations to make connections between leadership theory, effective teaching, and system change.

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EDUC 504 - Instructional Design and Assessment

Teacher leaders continually reflect and seek opportunities to improve their practice. Understanding the interdisciplinary relationships between curriculum, instruction, assessment, and learning environment are central to strengthening pedagogy and making better instructional decisions for learners. Students will hone their repertoire of instructional and assessment practices by adding technology tools for teaching, assessment, and instructional decision making.

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EDUC 505 - Dynamics of Adult Learning and Professional Collaboration

A growing body of evidence has shown that professional collaboration of teachers is a significant factor in school improvement. Teachers, learners, and school systems benefit in a variety of ways when teachers are able to collaborate on matters of curriculum, instruction, and professional development. From adult learning theory and learner-focused professional development to teaching in higher education, students will examine the unique aspects of creating, facilitating, and assessing adult learning. In addition, students will examine effective coaching and mentoring strategies and ethical considerations of leadership to foster effective collaboration with new and experienced teachers.

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EDUC 506 - Curriculum Development and Evaluation

A strong foundation in trends and models provides a teacher leader with the background necessary to continuously improve curriculum. Students will analyze models of curriculum design, practice selecting materials that align to standards, and use data to evaluate curricula and programs in their local setting.

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EDUC 507 - Teaching and Assessing Virtual Classrooms

Increasing opportunities for online learning necessitate teacher leader be well-versed in the critical attributes of effective digital learning. Students will explore the foundations and research of digital learning in order to design pedagogical practices that are aligned to standards and meet individual learner needs and interests.

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EDUC 508 - Shared Leadership and Supervision

Teacher leaders support school administrators in a variety of ways. As partners in school improvement efforts, teacher leaders may serve as grade level or department chairs, new teacher mentors, or instructional coaches. Through a shared leadership mental model, students will examine the variety of teacher leadership roles including supervision of instruction and evaluation of teachers. As a final course requirement, students may either complete the Iowa Evaluator Approval module or may choose to create a leadership project.

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EDUC 509 - Issues and Advocacy in Teacher Leadership

Once teacher leaders have the solidified their background knowledge and skills related to their local schools, they have an ethical responsibility to advocate on behalf of learner needs and effective teaching practices. From understanding how educational policy is developed to pioneering the creation of reform efforts, students will examine the pivotal role of teacher leaders as advocates for their profession.

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ENGL 01 IS - Interpreting Poetry

Students will review techniques for analyzing poetry and reading poetry aloud. One written poetry analysis and one oral reading presentation will be required. A departmental review of each student's written analysis serves as the department's entering writing assessment and as a prerequisite for entry into WRTG 420.

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ENGL 02 IS - Careers for Humanities Majors

Students evaluate their career goals, research jobs, prepare application materials, discuss graduate school, and examine pressing issues of the workplace: diversity, networking, office politics, and professionalism.

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ENGL 05 IS - History of Literary Criticism

Students will study the evolution of Literary Criticism from Plato and Aristotle to contemporary approaches such as new criticism, psychological criticism, deconstruction, feminist criticism and post-colonial criticism.

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ENGL 06 IS - Evaluating Contemporary Literature

Students will examine and evaluate very recent fiction, poetry and film in an attempt to formulate their own criteria for what is good and what is bad in literature. Prerequisite: Junior status and above

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ENGL 110 - Introduction to Literature

Students read short stories and poems for enjoyment, discussion and analysis. Learning literary terms and critical methods will be added course outcomes.

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ENGL 114 - Multicultural Plays and Films

Students will gain an understanding of and appreciation for the diversity of possible cultural perspectives and expectations by studying a variety of plays, texts and recent films from a number of Western-Hemisphere cultures.

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ENGL 125 - Film and Literature

Students will examine a number of significant films based upon previous short stories, novels or plays to learn the ideas, forms and conventions of these related artistic endeavors.

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ENGL 14 IS - Adolescent Literature

Students will read and evaluate adolescent novels such as The Chocolate War, The Midwife's Apprentice, Holes, Out of the Dust, Sold, The Book Thief, and others.

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ENGL 140 - Multicultural Voices

Literature of various cultural groups from the Americas. Students will read novels, stories, poetry and essays by a host of individuals who are representative of a rich stream of ethnic groups.

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ENGL 150 - Women's Voices

An exploration of the history of women's efforts to find their own voice through literature. Readings may include Mary Wollstonecraft, Virginia Woolf, Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Tillie Olsen, Adrienne Rich, Maya Angelou, Denise Levertov, Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, Julia Alvarez, Dorothy Alison, Toni Morrison, Margaret Atwood, and others.

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ENGL 16 IS - Briar Cliff Review: Proofing and Producing

(Also ENGL 80M) Students will read, select, compile, design, edit and proof a nationally- acclaimed literary magazine.

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ENGL 175 - Independent English Study

By arrangement with instructor only. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill With departmental approval

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ENGL 210 - Modern Fiction

American, British and world writers of novels and short stories from the 20th century. Authors include Conrad, Kafka, Joyce, Lawrence, Faulkner, Woolf, Heminway, O'Brien, Cunningham, Morrison, Proulx, and others. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill.

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ENGL 211 - Modern Poetry

Major poets and poems of the high modernist era through the twentieth century are examined to gain appreciation of their formal and thematic concerns. Poets include Frost, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Langston Hughes, Elizabeth Bishop, Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, Gwendolyn Brooks, and others. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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ENGL 243 - Shakespeare

Representative plays from the major types (comedy, history, tragedy) for reading and analysis. Students will appreciate the universality of Shakespeare's art: "He was not of an age, but for all time." Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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ENGL 260 - Classics of World Literature

Presents diverse literature from the Renaissance to the postcolonial period by such luminaries as Voltaire, Goethe, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Kafka, Levi, Garcia Marquez, Achebe, and Arundhati Roy. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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ENGL 275 - Independent English Study II

By arrangement with instructor only. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill With departmental approval

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ENGL 305 - Classical Literature and Mythology

Students will gain a knowledge and appreciation of important myths and literary works and an understanding of the cultures and belief systems that produced these by studying the literatures of Classical Greece and Rome, including Greek and Roman myths, epics, poetry and plays.

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ENGL 310 - Medieval Literature

Students will encounter the foundations of our culture by reading works from the Middle Ages. d Authors and works include Beowulf, Chaucer, Sir Gawain, Everyman, Dante, and others. y Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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ENGL 320 - British Renaissance Literature

Students will encounter the rebirth of learning and humanism from the 16th through the 17th centuries through reading works by British authors such as Spenser, Sidney, Marlowe, Donne, Ben Johnson, Herbert, Milton, and others. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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ENGL 330 - British Enlightenment Literature

Students will encounter the Age of Reason, satire and the beginning of the novel in English through reading works by British authors such as Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Fielding and others. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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ENGL 340 - Nineteenth Century American Literature

Essays, short stories, poetry, novels, and memoirs are studied in the historical, cultural, and artistic context of the nineteenth century. Seminal works by Irving, Rowson, Poe, Emerson, Stowe, Fuller, Hawthorne, Whitman, Dickinson, James and others. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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ENGL 345 - Twentieth Century American Literature

Fiction, poetry and drama including works by Faulkner, Cather, Heminway, Fitzgerald, Eliot, Ellison, Frost, Welty, Flannery O'Connor, Updike, Roth, Kesey, Morrison, Carver, Paley, Silko, Erdrich, Dove, Beattie, Li-Young, and others. The course focuses both on the history of the period and the artistic and intellectual response of America's writers and thinkers during this modern century. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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ENGL 360 - British Romanticism

Poetry, fiction and prose, including Blake, William Wordsworth, Dorothy Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Keats, and others. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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ENGL 365 - Victorian Literature

Prose, fiction and poetry including Charles Dickens, Alfred Tennyson, Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, Gerard Manley Hopkins and others. Works are examined both as literature and as expressions of the intellectual and social concerns of the nineteenth century in England.

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ENGL 375 - Independent English Study III

By arrangement with instructor only. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill With departmental approval

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ENGL 440 - Special Methods in Secondary Teaching

Resources, skills and practices for teaching English in high school. Required for certification. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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ENGL 460 - Senior Seminar

Historical and critical overview of major developments in literature with comprehensive examinations. Intended primarily for last-term senior English majors

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ENGL 475 - Independent English Study IV

By arrangement with instructor only. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill With departmental approval

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ENGL 490 - English Internship

On-site professional work experiences; site and scheduling individually arranged. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill and junior status. With departmental approval

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ESCI 175 - Independent Environmental Science Study

With department approval.

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ESCI 211 - Earth Science I: Introductory Geology

An introduction to the classification and formation of rocks, strata and soils. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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ESCI 213 - Earth Science III: Weather and Climate

An introduction to the daily variation of local atmospheric conditions and the results of the long-term patterns of such. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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ESCI 237 - General Ecology

A study of the interrelationships of organisms to their environment and each other at the population, community and ecosystem levels reinforced with a survey of North American biomes. Field observations and lab exercises in natural habitats. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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ESCI 275 - Independent Environmental Science Study II

With department approval

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ESCI 280 - Extended Field Trip

The Extended Field Trip typically provides an opportunity during a 10-14 day trip to study the major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems of a North American ecoregion.

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ESCI 300 - Entomology

An introduction to the biology, ecology and identification of insects. Lecture topics will also include adaptations, evolution, classification and medical applications of insects. Laboratory and field activities include dissection, sampling, specimen preparation and identification. Three lectures, two labs per week.

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ESCI 339 - Principles of Microbiology

An in-depth study of microorganisms, including ultra structure, growth characteristics, metabolism and genetics. Not open to students having credit for BIOL 239. Three lectures, two labs per week. Prerequisite: eight hours of chemistry or permission of the instructor

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ESCI 375 - Independent Environmental Science Study III

With department approval

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GDES 071 - Magazine Production

This is an elective course in conjunction with writing WRTG 06 IR, students will read, compile, design, layout, edit and proofread a literary magazine. In addition to layout for the Briar Cliff Review, students will be designing and constructing a publication that features their own creative work. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

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GDES 203 - The History of Graphic Design

As a graphic designer, it's important to be able to envision yourself and your work in the context of history. This course covers the history of visual communication (beginning with the Victorian period) with an emphasis on developments in graphic design and typography during the 20th century. You will learn how graphic design developed from various technical innovations to form a part of art history, cultural history and world history. You will gain an understanding of how design, specifically graphic design, has been defined as an art form and as a profession. You will study many prominent designers and learn to identify some of their most important works. Slide lectures are given throughout.

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GDES 224 - Typography

The history, terminology and design components of typography will be explored through lecture and studio exercises.

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ESCI 110 - Environmental Science

A survey of environmental issues and problems facing today's society. Includes a study of population biology, ecology, natural resources and energy, environmental quality, land use and bioethics. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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GDES 325 - Graphic Design Production I

This course will introduce the students to the techniques, processes, terminology, and basic compositional and conceptual skills of the graphic designer. The course stresses three main objectives: craftsmanship, composition and concept. Craftsmanship includes tools and materials and how to use them, with a heavy emphasis on precision and presentation. Composition builds upon the principles covered in Design, Typography and Graphic Communications and stresses the gestalt principles of visual perception as a foundation for understanding compositional problems. Conceptually the course covers design as a form of aesthetic expression and as a means of effective communication. The student is asked to solve problems using conventional as well as more experimental methods. Graphic design is a very demanding and competitive profession, but for those who truly love it, the demands are well worth meeting and the rewards go beyond financial. Students are expected to commit themselves and to work hard, every day, not just for better grades but for the enjoyment that the work brings and the growth that comes with it.

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GDES 335 - Graphic Design Production II

A continuation of GDES 325

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GDES 340 - Information Graphics

Explores the use of graphics to inform readers and or viewers of visual information. Students will gain experience in researching design and creation explanatory charts, maps, diagrams and other forms of information graphics. Computer technology is an essential tool in this process.

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ESCI 212 - Earth Science II: Earth Processes

A survey of the action of various geomorphological processes (such as wind, water and glaciation) which shape our globe. Ecological hazards inherent to land-uses of the landforms associated with these processes will also be discussed. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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GDES 350 - Advertising Design

Investigation, creation, and application of advertising design and the development of advertising campaigns. Course will focus on creative problem solving, audience, product, and client positioning, marketing, and creative strategies as applied to advertising, as well as the advertising design process. Course will also include creative team interaction, individual brainstorming techniques, and detailed research.

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GDES 400 - Senior Exhibition

Students will plan and prepare for a comprehensive exhibit that demonstrates the student's success in the program. Students will participate in the installation, promotion and all facets of a gallery exhibit.

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HCA 610 - Advanced Health Care Systems

Advanced Health Care Systems examines the daily operations of health care organizations. This course addresses governance, line management, staff support, and the implementation of business strategies. The course focuses on the effective management of health care professionals and identifies unique human resource elements in health care organizations.

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HCA 620 - International Health Care Systems

This course provides an in-depth understanding of health problems, health determinants, and the prevailing health care delivery models and systems in the world. The course will also look at the structure and functioning of national health systems based on geographic location and governance in developing and developed countries.

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HCA 640 - Financial Management for Health Care Organizations

An in-depth study of health care economics and the financial management of health care organizations. The economic principles underlying the American health care market and the financial management of health services organizations within that market are examined. Analysis covers free market and mixed market economies; barriers to free market economies; health care industry regulation, licensure, and certification; and various coverage and health care payment mechanisms. Topics also include reimbursement mechanisms and their effect on health care provider organizations, managed care, capitation, and per case or per diagnosis payment, as well as how these financial strategies are utilized by third-party payers. Focus is on financial challenges such as uncompensated care, cost increases, increased competition, and increased regulation and how health care providers should respond to them. Ratio analysis, cost analysis, working capital, capital budgeting and investment in relation to net present value and value added to the organization, and other financial management techniques are also discussed.

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HIST 239 - U.S. Popular Culture

The course will examine the profound effects of popular culture on the United States from the revolution to the present. Topics, ranging from popular democracy, consumerism, advertising, television, movies and popular music, will focus on how Americans participate in the formation, expression and direction of U.S. culture.

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HCA 650 - Legal & Regulatory Issues in Health Care

A comprehensive analysis of the more significant legal issues encountered by health care administrators and the ramifications of those issues. Both theoretical and practical applications of law are addressed with an analytical focus on the prompt identification of legal and bioethical issues arising from and affecting various health care employment settings. The principles of health care law in a complex constitutional system are examined in relation to current proposals and policy developments in areas such as privacy, contracts, tort reform, and the regulation of the health care marketplace. Topics include legal and regulatory constraints imposed on the health care industry, the liability of health care providers, the rights of patients, employment law and labor relations, and administrative law for health care organizations.

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HIST 256 - An Introduction to Russian History

This course briefly examines the origins of the Moscovite state with a more in-depth analysis of Russia from Peter the Great. This course will emphasize major formative influences, important rulers, the 1917 Revolution, the impact of Lenin and Stalin, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Post-Cold War.

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HCA 670 - Advanced Health Care Management

A study of the nature of management and how it is applied in various health care settings. Contemporary theories, critical perspectives, models, and best practices designed to foster performance excellence in the highly competitive health care environment are examined. Discussion also addresses the complexities and challenges of health systems.

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HIST 260 - An Introduction to East Asian History

This course provides an introduction to East Asian history, primarily China and Japan. The course will examine their social, cultural and economic and political development, focusing on both internal developments as well as interaction with foreign nations.

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ESCI 401 - Environmental Law and Policy

An overview of environmental law and public policy.

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HCA 680 - Health Care Administration Practicum (Optional)

The optional practicum provides students with an opportunity to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills they have acquired throughout the M.H.A. program and further develop key professional competencies. This experience is in alignment with the students’ academic and professional goals and proceeds under the supervision of faculty. Supervision by an on-site preceptor is a critical component of the practicum.

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HIST 275 - Independent Study II

Directed research and discussion in history. Topics to be determined by the student and the major advisor. With departmental approval

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ESCI 412 - Field Botany

An introduction to the classification, nomenclature and identification of vascular plants. Taxonomic and biogeographical relationships of families, genera and species will also be discussed. The laboratory will be devoted to an examination of the spring flora by emphasizing the identification and recognition of ferns, trees, shrubs and herbs. Proper collection and herbarium techniques will be practiced as students prepare specimens for a required plant collection. Three lectures, one lab per week.

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HIST 108 - International Travel Seminar

This course offers students the opportunity to visit various locales of historic or cultural significance. Readings, journaling and orientation sessions will be required. Specific destinations will change depending on student and faculty interest.

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HIST 337 - Twentieth Century World History

This survey seeks to find the causes and effects of current world problems and crises. Special emphasis will be placed on countries and events that are focal points in world affairs today. These include the nation-state and minorities, radical communist, fascists, and religious ideologies, de-colonization, modernization and Westernization.

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HIST 345 - Diplomatic History of the United States

This survey course acquaints students with diplomatic history of the United States since 1865. The course emphasizes foreign policy issues of the twentieth century, including United States participation in the First and Second World Wars, the Cold War, the Korean and Vietnam Conflicts, Desert Storm and the War on Terrorism.

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HIST 351 - Studies in American History I

This course explores great issues/themes in American history from European discovery to the outbreak of the Civil War (e.g. Puritanism, the American Revolution, slavery). The course teaches students to understand these issues/themes within the broader historical context of the era as well as develop their written and verbal skills.

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HIST 352 - Studies in American History II

The course explores great issues/themes in American history from the Civil War through the onset of the Great Depression (e.g. The Frontier West, Progressivism, The Roaring 1920s). The course places each issue/theme within a broader historical context and encourages students to develop written and verbal skills.

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HIST 175 - Independent Study

Directed research and discussion in history. Topics to be determined by the student and the major advisor. With departmental approval

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HIST 353 - Studies in American History III

This course explores great issues/themes in American history from the Great Depression through the present (e.g. World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, etc.). The course places these issues/themes within the broader historical context and works to develop students' written and verbal skills.

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HIST 203 - Historical Inquiry

Historical Inquiry is for students considering a major or minor in history or related field. The main purpose of the course is to investigate what it means to be a historian. This course explores the nature, uses, and methodologies of historical inquiry as well as the various career options available for those interested in History.

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HIST 360 - Social History of Western Civilization

This course will focus on in-depth analyses of major social themes in Western history from early civilization to the twentieth century. The classes will be seminar style, basing discussion on the articles read for each class. The course strengthens the ability to identify arguments, evaluate evidence and analyze primary documents, while developing writing and verbal skills. There will be presentations and papers.

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HIST 224 - The Vietnam Experience

A survey of the 2,000-year history of Vietnam, the French Indochina War and U.S. involvement, the U.S. military role, the viewpoints of those who participated, and discussion of the consequences of American participation in the Asian conflict. The attitudes and cultural mores leading up to the U.S. commitment in southeast Asia. Exploration of the anti-Vietnam War movement will also take place.

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HIST 375 - Independent Study III

Directed research and discussion in history. Topics to be determined by the student and the major advisor. With departmental approval

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HIST 231 - American History to 1877

A survey of the history of the American people from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War.

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HIST 440 - Special Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Science

A course designed to review current approaches to the teaching of the social sciences, with special emphasis on the teaching of history, incorporating audio-visual materials and computers in the classroom, and devising innovative strategies to meet the needs and demands of contemporary students. With departmental approval

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HIST 232 - U.S. History Since 1877

A survey of the history of the American people from the South's reconstruction to the present.

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HIST 468 - Intellectual History

This course will briefly survey the five major intellectual currents of metaphysics, politics, ethics, logic and aesthetics, followed by an analysis of how various historical figures, thinkers and events fit into one of the five categories. This course will point out major trends in Western thought, as well as developing higher-level thinking, writing and verbal skills. Prerequisites: HIST: 335, 336, 337

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HIST 238 - History of Urban America

The course will explore, discuss and seek to understand the America's urban community from the European colonial era to the present. The course will focus on the social, economic and political ramifications of change to America's urban population.

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HIST 470 - Senior Thesis

The senior thesis represents the "capstone" of the history degree, the last step in a student's undergraduate education at Briar Cliff. In the course of the seminar, you will select a topic, organize a bibliography, conduct research and write a thesis.

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HIST 475 - Independent Study IV

Directed research and discussion in history. Topics to be determined by the student and the major advisor. With departmental approval

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HIST 490 - History Internship

Supervised practical training in an area of interest mutually acceptable to department faculty members and student. With departmental approval

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HPER 118 - Personal and Community Health

An introductory course concerned with the many factors which influence a person's health. Special consideration is afforded the subject areas of substance abuse, disease and holistic health. Consideration is also given to the functions which various health agencies serve and to the modern technological advances which have been accomplished in health.

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HPER 119 - Introduction to and History of Physical Education

Health Education and Recreation 3 sem. hrs. The student is introduced to five foundational areas - the historical, philosophical, psychological, physiological and sociological - of physical education, health education and recreation. A sixth unit in the course is designed to orient the student to the scope of the profession, including professional opportunities in the allied areas such as health, safety education and recreation.

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HPER 175 - Independent HPER Study

Open to juniors and seniors who wish to engage in an in-depth directed research project in a selected area. Permission of the program coordinator is required. With departmental approval

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HPER 214 - Physical Education Activities for Pre-K to 6 Elementary Schools

This course will be a curriculum of physical education activities for grades K-6. The program will include fitness concepts, movement education, perceptual-motor concepts, manipulative activities and the acquisition of skills. Varied and new experiences for each grade level will be emphasized. There will be a stress on the necessity of child success and accomplishment through Elementary Physical Education.

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HPER 231 - Recreation Leadership

A course designed to study the fundamentals of recreation and play as it relates to various cultures. Consideration is given to the type of job opportunities in recreation and playground management.

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HIST 110 - An Introduction to World Civilizations

This survey will study the various patterns of world civilizations, beginning with ancient societies. The course will focus mainly on their social and cultural influences, trans-cultural interactions, and the impact of these societies on the present.

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HPER 232 - Camp Counseling

A course designed to prepare students for various camp counseling or related job positions. Special consideration is given to the organization and administration of the camping program. Course includes a campout.

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HIST 113 - Western Civilization I

This survey traces the origins of important movements in early Western Civilization from the Greeks to the Romans, developments in Judaism and Christianity and feudal Europe up to the Renaissance and Reformation.

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HPER 261 - Practicum in Athletic Training

The student will get hands on experience in an athletic training setting. They will be active in initial evaluation of injuries, care of injuries, referrals, record keeping and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. They will be under the direct supervision of a certified athletic trainer. There will be a minimum of 150 hours of athletic training experience.

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HIST 114 - Western Civilization II

This survey traces the origins of important movements in early Western Civilization from the Scientific Revolution and Age of Absolutism through French Revolution, Napoleonic Wars, and German unification to World War I.

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HPER 275 - Independent HPER Study II

Open to juniors and seniors who wish to engage in an in-depth directed research project in a selected area. Permission of the program coordinator is required. With departmental approval

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HPER 280 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

Prevention, protection and first aid care of injuries occurring in athletics. Evaluation of protective devices, diets and conditioning. Lab work includes taping and rehabilitation of the injured.

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HPER 338 - Teaching Movement Pre K-6

This course is designed to give the physical education major teaching experience in primary and upper elementary physical education. Planning of lessons, instructional analysis and formative evaluations will be part of this experience. Conferences with the supervising teacher and observation will be with the instructor of the course. Prerequisite: 214

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HPER 375 - Independent HPER Study III

Open to juniors and seniors who wish to engage in an in-depth directed research project in a selected area. Permission of the program coordinator is required. With departmental approval

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HPER 382 - Curriculum, Computers/Media and Methods of Phys. Ed.

A study of the organization and techniques of teaching physical education activities on the junior high and senior high school levels. Selection of materials, presentation, curriculum content and class organization are all part of the discussion and study. Areas of study include archery, basketball, volleyball, weight training and bowling. Laboratory experiences provided. Prerequisite: Junior HPER major, minor or permission

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HPER 383 - Advanced Physical Education Skills

A study of the organization and techniques of teaching physical education activities on the junior high and senior high school levels. Selection of materials, presentation, curriculum content and class organization are all part of the discussion and study. Areas of study include soccer, softball-baseball, badminton, tennis, racquetball, golf and micro-teaching. Laboratory experiences provided. Prerequisite: Junior HPER major, minor or permission

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HPER 384 - Human Performance and Skill Learning

A study of the scientific foundations of high-level performance and skill learning. Incorporates findings of exercise physiology, psychology and physical education in the area of human movement. Stresses application for the practitioner. Prerequisite: junior standing

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HPER 385 - Concepts of Coaching

Exposure to key concepts pertinent to the prospective high school coach concentrating on administrative responsibilities. Pre, in and post season preparation; sports psychology and motivation of athletes; and ethical issues and current pressures facing today's athletic programs. Prerequisite: Must be a HPER major, minor, or person presently in coaching certification program or with permission of instructor

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HPER 4(x) - HPER Activity Courses

HPER Activity courses are designed to develop attitudes, appreciation, personal skills and applied techniques in all types of activities included in the physical education program. Minimum standards of skill and knowledge are required for satisfactory completion of each activity unit. See program director for a list.

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HPER 439 - Kinesiology

Study of the basic mechanics involved in human motion, emphasis on the application of anatomy and elementary physics to the teaching of physical activities and sports skills. Prerequisite:junior standing

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HPER 443 - Organization and Administration of Physical Education and Athletics

Physical Education and Athletics 3 sem. hrs. A study into the curriculum, organization and administration of physical education and athletics at the junior high and high school level. Philosophy, facilities, purchasing, budgeting, hiring and supervision are discussed. Prerequisite:junior or senior physical education major

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HPER 461 - Advanced Athletic Training

An in-depth study and practice of physical examination of sport's injuries and muscle testing. Included will be initial inspection, bony palpation, soft tissue palpation, range of motion, neurological examination, and ligament stability tests. All body areas will be covered. Advanced rehabilitation and treatment procedures will be covered.

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HPER 475 - Independent HPER Study IV

Open to juniors and seniors who wish to engage in an in-depth directed research project in a selected area. Permission of the program coordinator is required. With departmental approval

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HPER 490 - HPER Internship

To be arranged. Permission of the department is required. With departmental approval

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HPER 51 IR - Adapted Physical Education: Theory and Practice

Provides the theoretical basis for the future teacher's needs in working with the special child in the normal and/or segregated physical education setting. Laboratory experiences for teaching physical education in the schools to physically, sensory, mentally and multi-handicapped children will be provided. Special consideration to mandated skills such as writing; individual education.

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HPER 52 IR - Recreation for the Disabled Person

The focus will be on leisure-time activities for the handicapped in a community setting. Laboratory experiences for observation, teaching and participation will be provided.

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HPER 53 IR - Adapted Physical Activities: Living and Working

The future teacher and recreation specialist will utilize community resources and environments where the handicap live and work. Programs will be studied and participated in that encompass the Special Olympics, Special-Needs Camping Programs, STARS Program and research concerns in the area of adapted physical education. Prerequisite: HPER 51IR or 52IR, or permission of instructor

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HPER 61 IR - Senior Practicum

While serving as teaching assistant, students are availed experiences in lesson planning, class organizing, grading and the actual teaching of physical skills. Prerequisite: senior status

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HPER 63 IR - Methods of Teaching Track and Field

Exposure to and analysis of basic skills, different techniques and approaches involved in teaching and/or coaching the variety of events including safety precautions involved in the sport of track and field. Field experience provided.

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HPER 64 IR - Fitness Testing and Exercise Prescription

Basic skills and understanding are developed in the art and science of fitness testing and exercise prescription. The conducting of individualized fitness programs for all age groups will be examined.

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HPER 65 IR - First Aid and CPR Instructors Course

This course is designed to certify the student as an American Red Cross First Aid and/or CPR Instructor. Current basic certification in first aid and CPR is required.

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HRM 175 - Independent HRM Study

With department approval.

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HRM 275 - Independent HRM Study II

With department approval

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HRM 325 - Human Resource Management

This course focuses on human resource policies, issues, principles and methodologies. Through activities and case studies the student is able to apply the theory from the text to realistic problems from the work world.

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HRM 335 - Organizational Behavior

This course uses a theory and experienced-based approach to study influences and outcomes of individual and group behavior within organizations. Sample topics include individual differences, motivation, culture, power/politics, stress, groups and communication.

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HRM 336 - Training and Development

This course is designed to allow the student to develop expertise in the construction and execution of training and development activities relevant to human resource issues. Teamwork and change management strategies are developed and implemented through research studies. Case studies and role playing will also comprise assignments in this class.

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HRM 355 - Employment Law

Issues dealt with in this course include Supreme Court interpretation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act including Affirmative Action, Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and Age Discrimination. Also included are the Americans with Disabilities Act, Rehabilitation Act, Immigration Reform and Control Act, Family Medical Leave Act and other pertinent workplace laws. Case studies and other problem solving approaches will be used.

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HRM 375 - Independent HRM Study III

With department approval.

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HRM 385 - Global Management

This course studies how businesses plan, develop, market and distribute products/services on a global scale. A special emphasis is placed on how businesses adapt to different cultural, political, and economic environments. The course further discusses and covers the importance of international human resource management for global firms.

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HRM 390 - HRM Internship

With departmental approval

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HRM 408 - Labor Management Relations

HRM 420 - Compensation

This course analyzes concepts and practices of compensation administration in organizations. Job evaluation methods, salary structures, legal constraints and compensation programs and benefits are covered.

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HRM 425 - Strategic Human Resources Management

This course is designed for the student to incorporate knowledge from previous Human Resource courses into decision-making analysis. Case studies will be used for problem evaluation and decision making. Prerequisite: Minimum of 15 HRM hours including HRM 325

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HRM 475 - Independent HRM Study IV

With department approval

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HRM 490 - HRM Internship II

With department approval

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HRM 510 - Employment Law

This course covers the major laws and programs that affect employers and employees in the workplace. Equal Employment Opportunity Act (EEOA), Affirmative Action, Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), Family Medical and Leave Act (FMLA), and National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) are a sample of the regulations covered.

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HRM 550 - Compensation

This course examines internal consistency through various job evaluation methods, external competitiveness, and administration of wage and salary program. Merit pay plans, employee income security systems, legislation issues and benefits will be discussed in depth.

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HRM 630 - Human Resource Measurement

This course examines Human Resource Management from an accountability and cost per point of view. Measuring employee absenteeism, turnover, discrimination, and other legal costs allows student to support arguments to management in this problem-based course. Value-added items will also be studied.

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HRM IS - HRM Independent Study

Intensive study in a human resource management topic. Open to junior and senior HRM majors only

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LDR 540 - Non-Profit Management & Leadership

This class provides an introduction to the nonprofit sector and the leadership and management skills required to achieve social impact. During the semester, students examine and discuss the trends, issues, and challenges facing a nonprofit leader as well as management approaches and innovations by examining case studies and course readings. Although the class focuses around the nonprofit world, lessons are drawn from the corporate and government sectors as well.

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LDR 570 - Leadership Theory & Ethics

This course presents analysis of historical concepts regarding leadership with a special focus on leadership ethics. Developmental processes related to ethical leadership behavior will be studied. This course introduces quantitative and qualitative research methodologies appropriate for leadership issues.

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LDR 680 - Innovative Leadership

Innovative leadership requires the managers to empower employees to be passion, forward thinking, and motivated to perform in a successful organization. This course will address advanced concepts and methods of managing complex organization and systems in the public, non-profit and private sectors using a variety of creative learning methods.

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LDR 690 - Leadership Roles in Business

This course examines Servant Leadership, with a focus on moral and ethical leadership. Students will create a service project in the community which will integrate and apply the theories, frameworks and learning from this course.

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LIBA 200 - Black Hills Experience

The Black Hills Experience is a multidisciplinary course which is conducted in the Black Hills of South Dakota in May during the week immediately after Term III. Subject matter includes biology, chemistry, geology, history and literature of this unique area of the country. The course can be taken as an elective.

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LIBA 410 - Global Society

An interdisciplinary study of contemporary global realities focusing on the increasingly interdependent economic, ecological, political, social, technological, religious, cultural and peace relationships that are developing within the human community.

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MATH 10 - Basic Algebra

Reviews basic algebra concepts and skills of first-year high school algebra starting with signed numbers. Other topics that will be covered are: exponents, expressions, linear equations and inequalities, graphing, polynomials, algebraic fractions, quadratics, and more.

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MATH 105 - Mathematics for Liberal Arts Students

An introduction to the nature of mathematics and its applications in the physical world. Topics include numerical reasoning, symbolism and algebra, geometric reasoning and measurement, the function concept, discrete mathematics and algorithms, probability and statistical reasoning, mathematical modeling, and inductive and deductive arguments. Prerequisite: MATH 10 or recommendation of the department chairperson

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MATH 111 - College Algebra

Functions and graphs, mathematical modeling, linear functions, average rate of change, exponential functions, relative rate of change, exponential growth and decay, logarithmic functions, quadratic functions, polynomial and rational functions, systems of linear equations, matrices. Prerequisite: Recommendation of the department chairperson based on mathematics assessment.

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MATH 118 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I

MATH 118 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I 3 sem. hrs. Emphasis on the understanding of mathematics taught in elementary school using a problem- solving approach and recommendations of the Iowa Core Mathematics. Topics from basic mathematics include numeration systems, whole numbers, operations, problem solving, measurement, sequences, sets, functions, Venn diagrams, and mathematical reasoning. Prerequisite: MATH 10 or recommendation of the department chairperson based on mathematics assessment

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MATH 119 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II

Continued emphasis on the understanding of mathematics taught in elementary school using problem-solving approach and recommendations of the Iowa Core Mathematics. Topics include number theory, integers, fractions, decimals, rational and irrational numbers, proportions, percent, geometry, probability, and statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 118

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MATH 150 - Essentials of Statistics

An introduction to the theory and applications of statistics intended for students in business, nursing and the social sciences, but also recommended for students in the liberal arts.

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MATH 1A - Fundamentals of Mathematics

A review of arithmetic skills including fractions, decimals, percents and measurement.

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MATH 200 - Elementary Statistics

An introduction to the theory and applications of statistics intended for students in business, nursing and the social sciences, but also recommended for students in the liberal arts. Topics include measures of central tendency and variability, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear regression, correlation, analysis of variance and nonparametric statistics. This course is not open to those in a mathematics major. Prerequisite: MATH 10 or recommendation of the department chairperson based upon mathematics assessment

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MATH 217 - Calculus I

Functions, mathematical models, limits, continuity, slope and instantaneous velocity, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, related rates, linearization, exponential and logarithmic models, indeterminate forms, graphical analysis, optimization problems, antiderivatives, definite integrals, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus Prerequisite: Recommendation of the department chairperson based on mathematics assessment

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MATH 218 - Calculus II

Techniques of integration, applications of definite integrals, numerical integration, improper integrals, differential equations, infinite series, convergence tests, power series, Taylor polynomials, parametric curves, polar curves, vectors, dot and cross products, lines and planes in space. Prerequisite: MATH 217

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MATH 219 - Calculus III

Vector-valued functions, curvilinear motion, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, linear approximations, directional derivatives and gradients, optimization, multiple integrals and applications, vector fields, line integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 218

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MATH 225 - Discrete Mathematics

Set theory, sequences, counting principles, probability, matrix algebra, relations, functions, algorithms, ordering and binary operations, Boolean algebras, graphs and trees. Prerequisite: MATH 111 or recommendation of the department chairperson based on mathematics assessment

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MATH 245 - Mathematical Reasoning

A bridge course to a fundamental conceptual understanding of the nature of abstract mathematics. Topics include inductive and deductive reasoning, abstraction and generalization, valid arguments, counterexamples, conjecture and proof, and methods of proof. Prerequisite: MATH 218

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MATH 275 - Independent Mathematics Study

Topics chosen from an area of mathematics of interest to the student and the instructor. Available to mathematics majors and minors only. Prerequisite: consent of the department chairperson. With departmental approval

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MATH 305 - Geometry for Teachers

A survey of topics in geometry with an emphasis on investigation and discovery. Topics include: incidence, betweenness, angles, congruence, parallelism, geometric inequalities, transformations and non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisite: MATH 245 or consent of instructor

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MATH 324 - Statistical Methods I

Topics include probability, principles of statistical inference, inferences on a single population, and inferences on two populations. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of basic concepts and the solutions of problems using computer output from realistic data similar to that occurring in common applications. Prerequisite: MATH 111 or consent of instructor

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MATH 325 - Statistical Methods II

Topics include analysis of variance, various types of regression, and other statistical techniques including t-tests and design of experiments. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of basic concepts and the solutions of problems using computer output from realistic data similar to that occurring in common applications. Prerequisite: MATH 324

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MATH 344 - Linear Algebra

Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, determinants, vector spaces, subspaces, basis and dimension, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformations and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 218

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MATH 350 - Numerical Analysis

An introduction to numerical analysis with emphasis on numerical methods and computer solutions. Intended for students in mathematics, natural sciences and pre-engineering. The topics covered will include Newton, Trapezoidal, Simpson methods, Gauss quadrature, interpolation, curve-fitting and splines. Prerequisite: MATH 218

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MATH 375 - Independent Mathematics Study II

Topics chosen from an area of mathematics of interest to the student and the instructor. Available to mathematics majors and minors only. Prerequisite: consent of the department chairperson. With departmental approval

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MATH 405 - Abstract Algebra

An introduction to some of the fundamental algebraic structures with emphasis on the axiomatic method. Topics include mathematical induction, equivalence relations, divisibility, congruence relations, rings, integral domains, fields, polynomials rings, factorization, groups, abelian groups, cyclic groups, permutation groups, homomorphism and isomorphism, cosets, quotient structures, extension fields. Prerequisite: MATH 245

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MATH 407 - Mathematical Statistics

Topics include probability, calculation of moments (mean and variance), calculation of moment generating functions, principles of statistical inference, distributions of random variables, and the derivation of tests of statistical hypotheses. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of basic concepts, maximum likelihood estimators, minimum variance estimators, sufficient statistics, the derivation of best tests, and the solutions of problems using computer output from realistic data similar to that occurring in common applications. Prerequisite: MATH 218

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MATH 440 - Special Methods of Teaching Secondary School Mathematics

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and experience to enable them to become effective secondary mathematics teachers. Emphasis will be on instruction, curriculum design, problem solving, usage of technology, assessment, and national and state standards. Special attention will be given to the teaching of high school math subjects such as geometry, algebra, and more. Required field experience including a teaching component: 20 hours with a teaching component. Prerequisite: MATH 218, MATH 225, EDUC 210, and EDUC 250

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MATH 475 - Independent Mathematics Study III

Topics chosen from an area of mathematics of interest to the student and the instructor. Available to mathematics majors and minors only. Prerequisite: consent of the department chairperson. With departmental approval

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MATH 490 - Mathematics Internship

Experience involving applications of undergraduate mathematics in an industrial or commercial setting. Open to junior and senior mathematics majors with consent of the department chairperson. With departmental approval

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MATH 535 - Graduate Statistics

This course focuses on the relationship between research methodology and quantitative statistical procedures, specifically it emphasizes the study of research methods and statistics in sufficient depth so that the advanced practice nurse can translate research findings into clinical practice, and plan and conduct investigations and program evaluations for improvement of health services. Specifically, this course focuses on computer-based calculations/data management, and interpreting and analyzing statistics most often encountered in clinical and educational research.

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MATH 540 - Biostatistics

This course is a survey of the theory and methods of statistics intended for students in nursing. Emphasis is placed on the under-standing of basic concepts and the solutions of problems using computer printouts on realistic data similar to that occurring in common applications.

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MATH IS - Independent Math Research

Intensive study of an advanced topic in mathematics. Open to junior and senior mathematics majors. Prerequisite: consent of instructor

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MCOM 101 - Introduction to Mass Media

Overview of mass media and their respective social, psychological, international, political, legal and cultural impacts, including: communications law, cable television and satellite broadcasting. Prerequisite for all other course work in this major or minor

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MCOM 200 - Beginning Newswriting

Instruction in basic skills for writing in print journalism. Includes news values, writing leads, rewrites and follow-ups, and writing simple, complex and special story types. Students may be expected to submit publishable stories to the campus newspaper or other campus publications. All first-year students are strongly advised to take WRTG 159 before beginning the print sequence.

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MCOM 216 - Digital Photography

Introduction to digital photography. Material covered includes operation of 35mm professional digital camera including aperture, shutter and depth of field in manual control. Camera handling and care lighting, composition, visual communication and photographic history. Extensive digital darkroom (IMC) work using Photoshop software application is required. Lab fee includes camera rental fee.

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MCOM 220 - Visual Communications

Study of the graphic revolution and "image" as a powerful instrument of communication in society. Investigation of the pseudo-event, propaganda, public opinion and man's insatiable appetite for information. All forms of visual media (print, TV, advertising, digital, cinema, computer and the Internet) will be analyzed for obvious and hidden messages and their effects.

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MCOM 225 - Graphic Communications

An introduction to the process of graphic arts production with emphasis on the various methods and techniques translating ideas and information to print material. The primary focus will be on production, layout and typography as they apply to print media, advertising and public relations. Newspaper, magazine and newsletter formats are discussed.

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MCOM 230 - Global Media Studies

An overview of the present state of global media and journalism theory; a critical analysis of the main issues confronting media organizations, audiences and those working in or with the media; and a comparative study of the cultures and media within the world's eight major media regions.

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MCOM 300 - Legal and Ethical Issues in the Media

Study and discussion of ethical and moral considerations among journalists , acceptable actions by staff and management, as well as discussion of the grey areas of media responsibility. The course will also include legal issues such as constitutional and statutory law and the regulating agencies which affect the media. Student is required to participate in a community field service assignment. (Completion of the general education ethical foundation is required before beginning this course.)

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MCOM 307 - Public Relations

This course is a general overview of the field of public relations-how it functions in organizations and in society. The course proceeds from the perspective that public relations is a communication management function through which organizations adapt to, alter or maintain their environment in order to achieve organizational goal. The course addresses how public relations is used to improve productivity for business, government and not-for-profit organizations; how organizations can more effectively respond to regulatory initiatives and organization-wide strategic planning.

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MCOM 31 - Cliff News Practicum I

Students will gain experience in writing for a newspaper on deadline. Students will write news, features, sports and editorial articles. This practical experience will also include a variety of duties in non-reporting areas will help to create a well-rounded journalist.

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MCOM 310 - Photojournalism

In depth study of photojournalism that includes assignment on deadline for all categories of photojournalism. Course includes individual assignments as well as photo essays and projects. Study of master photographers and photojournalists is included. The impact of photography as an information/communication tool, legal and ethical issues are discussed.

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MCOM 312 - Advanced Newswriting and Copyediting

Advance newswriting and copyediting for print media, covering local government, beats reporters, multipart in-depth stories, ethics and the law. Course includes intensive copyediting, headline writing, use of computer-assisted reporting techniques and news preparation.

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MCOM 32 - Cliff News Practicum II

Students will gain experience in writing for a newspaper on deadline. Students will write news, features, sports and editorial articles. This practical experience will also include a variety of duties in non-reporting areas will help to create a well-rounded journalist.

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MCOM 325 - Website Production

The technological, aesthetic and ethical phases of New Media will be examined. Student will use various software and hardware tools to create projects. This course will expose students to a variety of print and electronic publications (web, brochure, newsletter, newspaper and magazine are just a few). Students will strengthen their computer skills for a changing technological society. This course includes lecture and extensive lab production work.

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MCOM 330 - Video Production

Instruction and workshop in television broadcast news and public affairs production. Instruction in studio direction, production, audio, switcher and camera work. A minimum "C" grade must be achieved.

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MCOM 331 - Reporting for Electronic Media

Principles of scriptwriting for radio and television. Broadcast voice development, interviewing and production. Use of actualities, tape editing and splicing. Extensive use of BCU radio air shift required.

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MCOM 333 - Advanced Video Production

Hands-on instruction in non-linear, digital video editing and field video production. Students will produce newscasts and/or individual video projects. This course uses a Macintosh-based non-linear digital editing system.

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MCOM 407 - Social Media

An overview of the present state of global media and journalism theory; a critical analysis of the main issues confronting media organizations, audiences and those working in or with the media; and a comparative study of the cultures and media within the world's eight major media regions.

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MCOM 440 - Research In Mass Media

Individual exploration of a research topic in mass communication. Student will analyze and evaluate research and development an understanding of research as it relates of the field of mass communication. Prerequisite: Senior level status

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MCOM 490 - Internship/Work Experience

On-site work experience in media-related fields. Course offers both practical and professional experience. Minimum of 150 working hours for each. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chairperson is required

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MCOM 51 - Radio Practicum I

Students will gain experience in writing, announcing and production for on-air radio. This practical experience can also include on-air shifts, documentation, evaluation of music, remote broadcasts and programming .

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MCOM 52 - Radio Practicum II

Students will gain experience in writing, announcing and production for on-air radio. This practical experience can also include on-air shifts, documentation, evaluation of music, remote broadcasts and programming.

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MCOM 61 - Video Practicum I

Students will gain experience in TV production. This practical experience can also include writing, editing, producing, post-production and on-air experiences.

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MCOM 62 - Video Practicum II

Students will gain experience in TV production. This practical experience can also include writing, editing, producing, post-production and on-air experiences.

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MGMT 500 - Research Methods and Theory

This course is a research course involving the collection, manipulation, analysis and reporting of data using computer software (SPSS). It includes such topics as questionnaire development, pre-testing, sampling, coding, and interviewer training.

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MGMT 520 - Recruitment/Retention/Evaluation-Employees

This course examines the recruitment of employees, evaluation methods, and retention strategies in the workplace. Through analysis of various methods and strategies students will design recruitment, evaluation, and retention programs for organizations. Case studies will also be utilized.

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MGMT 530 - Teamwork & Change Management

This course develops expertise in construction and execution of training and development activities relevant to Human Resource issues. Teamwork and change management strategies are also developed through research studies. Case studies and role play will also comprise assignments in this class.

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MGMT 560 - Diversity in the Workplace

MGMT 590 - Conflict Resolution, Negotiation

This course covers the managerial problems that arise in the union/management relationship, the structure and the nature of the union institution, its impact on employment relationship, and the government regulatory setting in which the collective bargaining process take place. Simulations and case studies are used.

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MGMT 601 - Management Information Systems

This course examines the effects of technology on the human resource function, the role of HR Information Systems, the software choices, and use of outsourcing many of the HR systems due to the advances in technology.

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MGMT 611 - Financial Management

Students will learn how to analyze organizational financial statements (balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows) to better understand the relationship between finance and human resource management in organizations.

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MGMT 650 - International/Global Management

This course focuses on critical human resource issues facing administrators and managers whose activities require them to operate in an international environment, whether they are located in the US or abroad. Staffing. Management succession and development and reward systems will be studied through case analyses and class projects.

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MGMT 670 - Strategic Management

Human Resource Management will be addressed from the strategic point of view. This course will consist of studying issues currently being faced by executive management. Some issues include the transformation taking place in the Human Resource Management Function.

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MGMT 690 - Thesis

Students choosing to write a thesis may choose this option in place of another course. The course to be replaced with Thesis will be approved by the Program Director. The thesis should deal with the subject matter of the class being substituted.

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MIS 375 - Independent MIS Study

With department approval.

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MIS 390 - MIS Internship

On-the-job experience at a local business. Prerequisite: Senior status and the consent of the department

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MIS 475 - Independent MIS Study II

With department approval.

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MIS 490 - MIS Internship II

On-the-job experience at a local business. Prerequisite: Senior status and the consent of the department

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MIS IS - Independent MIS Research

Independent research on an advanced topic in business or computer science. Required of all junior and senior MIS science majors.

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MRKT 301 - Principles of Marketing

Study of the concepts and problems concerned with the flow of goods and services to the consumer. An analysis will be made of the following: Marketing functions, wholesale and retail institutions, and internal and external factors affecting activities. Prerequisite: Econ 210 or 211 or permission of instructor

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MRKT 305 - Consumer Behavior

The major objective of this course is to find out why people buy what they buy, when they buy and where they buy. Behavioral and social influences on the buying process will also be examined. This information is then used to more effectively plan marketing programs. Prerequisite: MRKT 301, PSYC 110 is recommended

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MRKT 308 - Sales Management

Students will learn more about the field of professional selling. Topics to be covered are: the context of sales and the place of sales in the marketing function; the external environment including the legal aspects and its impact on sales; the various steps in the sales process from prospecting to follow-up; professional and ethical behaviors; and the principles of sales management. Role playing will be utilized to give the student valuable experience in making a sales presentation. The final project will be to make a professional presentation on behalf of a student business. Prerequisite: MRKT 301

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MRKT 340 - Retail Management

This course provides an overview of the marketing and management of retail businesses. The course will include administration and strategic planning in large and small retail firms. It will also cover the management of retail functions including stock planning, inventory control, markup and pricing, merchandising, retail promotion, human resources management, store location, design and layout, legal and ethical issues, customer service and retention strategies. Prerequisite: MRKT 301

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MRKT 345 - Advertising and Integrated Marketing Communications

A survey of advertising objectives of different levels of business organization. The course deals with campaigns, techniques and various media available to firms and industry. Prerequisite: MRKT 301

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MRKT 360 - Marketing Research

The course examines the marketing research process from problem identification to A presentation of research results. It gives the student a hands-on approach for solving marketing problems and taking advantage of marketing opportunities. Prerequisite: MRKT 301 and a statistics course

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MRKT 365 - Supply Chain Management

The study of Supply Chain Management examines material and information management in conjunction with suppliers and customers. Globalization, collaboration, and the impact of the Internet will be ongoing themes in the examination of the topic. Specific topics to be covered are inventory management, channel management, and logistics. Prerequisite: MRKT 301, BUAD 350 would be helpful.

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MRKT 385 - Global Management

This course studies how businesses plan, develop, market and distribute products/services on a global scale. Special emphasis is placed on how businesses adapt to different cultural, political and economic environments. Prerequisite: MRKT 301

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MRKT 401 - Special Topics in Marketing

This course integrates flexibility into the marketing major. Topics of interest to marketing majors and the professor will be taught on a yearly basis dependent on the needs of both the marketplace and the students. Topics may include: International Marketing, Non Profit Marketing, Sports Marketing, Creative Marketing Strategies, Brand Management, Pricing or others as necessary. Prerequisite: MRKT 301

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MRKT 410 - Marketing Management

MUSC 114 - Music Theory I

An introductory course covering the basic elements of music including pitch, notation, rhythm, meter, scales, key signatures, modes, intervals and triads. This course is designed for the student with little or no background in music theory. Students with previous formal instruction in music theory may request to test out of this course by passing a Fundamentals Exam (see instructor).

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MUSC 114L - Music Theory Lab I

Sight singing and ear training lab corresponding to the regular lecture classes in Music Theory I. This course introduces students to sight singing using solfege syllables and to basic ear training skills. Exercises in keyboard harmony are also included.

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MUSC 115 - Music Theory II

Continued study of tonality in vocal and instrumental music including four-part choral writing and voice leading procedures. Also includes harmonic cadences, nonharmonic tones, melodic organization, rhythm, texture, and dominant seventh chords. Prerequisite: MUSC 114 or permission of instructor

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MUSC 115L - Music Theory Lab II

Sight singing and ear training lab corresponding to the regular lecture classes in Music Theory II. Basic practice in sight singing and melodic and harmonic dictation. Exercises in keyboard harmony are also included.

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MUSC 125 - American Popular Music (Online)

A music appreciation course focused on the history and evolution of rock music. Topics include ragtime, Tin Pan alley, jazz, rhythm and blues, gospel, country, soul, Motown, British invasion, folk psychedelic rock, southern rock, heavy metal, art and glitter rock, ska and reggae, punk rock, new wave, funk, disco, hip-hop and rap. All reading assignments, listening assignments, writing assignments, quizzes and exams are completed online.

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MUSC 220 - Music Appreciation

A survey of music literature with the purpose of furnishing a basis for informed listening to music. The course is designed to give an understanding of the various genres and forms of music, introduce different historical styles or art music, and expose the student to selection from the standard art music literature. There will be some time spent exploring traditional folk music, religious music, jazz, popular music, and music from the Eastern and Western cultures of the world. A large portion of the class will be used to explore traditional classical music. The elements of music will be introduced in order to help the student understand common terminology used while discussing music. There will be a great deal of listening to music in this course along with daily reading from the textbook.

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MUSC 225 - One World: Music of the World's Peoples

An introduction to non-Western music encountered in Native America, East Asia, Africa, India, Latin America, and the Middle East. This course explores musical cultures throughout the world examining a panorama of musical expression - music as a universal activity, discovering how other cultures create music and how they define it, how and when music is used in daily life and for special events, revealing how music is an expression of culture. Prerequisite: Honors student, music major or minor.

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MUSC 247 - Music History and Literature I

A study of musical developments in art music from their origins through the Pre-classical era (1760-70). Special emphasis is placed on the evolution of styles, forms, instrumentation, and performance practice. Areas to be explored include (but are not limited to): music of Antiquity; the development of Gregorian chant, organum, the isorhythmic motet, and the rise of the secular song in the Middle Ages; the importance of the Mass, the Motet, and the Madrigal in the Renaissance; the beginning of opera and the rise of instrumental music in the Baroque and Pre- classical eras. The musical elements will be introduced and the student is expected to do aural analysis and be able to identify through listening the music and forms from each of these period of music history.

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MUSC 248 - Music History and Literature II

A study of musical developments in art music from the Classical Period (1760-70) through to the present day. Special emphasis is placed on the evolution of styles, forms, instrumentation, and performance practice. The emergence and development of the symphony, sonata, concerto, art song, and opera will be studied as well as a variety of different music compositional styles. These styles include (but are not limited to): Classical, Romanticism, Impressionism, Expressionism, Neoclassicism, Primitivism, Serialism, Aleatoric music, Electronic music, Neoromanticism, and Minimalism. Very little emphasis will be placed on popular music or jazz. The musical elements will be introduced and the student is expected to do aural analysis and be able to identify through listening to music and forms from each of these periods of music history.

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MUSC 250 - Applied Organ Lessons

An additional fee is charged for private lessons in organ, piano and voice. Class instruction in piano and voice are offered for students with little or no background.

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MUSC 255 - Applied Piano Lessons

An additional fee is charged for private lessons in organ, piano and voice. Class instruction in piano and voice are offered for students with little or no background.

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MUSC 260 - Applied Voice Lessons

An additional fee is charged for private lessons in organ, piano and voice. Class instruction in piano and voice are offered for students with little or no background.

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MIS 220 - Microcomputer Applications for Business

A course designed to develop the skills necessary to use microcomputers for solving business- related problems by using various software packages (word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation). Other topics include computer hardware, operating system software and applications software.

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MUSC 314 - Music Theory III

Continued study of harmony including non-dominant sevenths, secondary dominants and leading tones, modulation and basic binary and ternary form. Introduction to altered chords including Neapolitan 6ths, borrowed chords and augmented 6th chords. Prerequisite: MUSC 115

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MIS 321 - Management Information Systems

A course designed to explore information systems from a managerial perspective. Other topics include information systems security, electronic business and telecommunication systems. Prerequisite: MIS 220 or permission of instructor

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MUSC 314L - Music Theory Lab III

Sight singing and ear training lab corresponding to the regular lecture classes in Music Theory III. Intermediate practice in sight singing and melodic and harmonic dictation. Exercises in keyboard harmony are also included.

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MIS 322 - System Analysis and Design

A course designed to study the analysis and design of information systems using the Systems Development Life Cycle approach and other methodologies. Prerequisite: MIS 322

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MUSC 315 - Music Theory IV

Introduction to late Renaissance polyphony, eighteenth-century counterpoint and the fugue. Extended and chromatic harmony including 9th, 11th, and 13th chords. Sonata form, rondo form, and variation technique. Introduction to contemporary music of the 20th and 21st centuries including twelve-tone technique and set theory anaylsis.

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MUSC 315L - Music Theory Lab IV

Sight singing and ear training lab corresponding to the regular lecture classes in Music Theory IV. Advanced practice in sight singing and melodic and harmonic dictation. Exercises in keyboard harmony are also included.

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MUSC 335 - Music for Elementary Teacher

Provides background skills and materials in music necessary for the prospective elementary teacher. Includes a study of methods and materials of music education in the elementary school. Students are required to attend one weekly lab session in addition to the three class periods.

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MUSC 340 - Piano Pedagogy

Interactive seminar focused on piano pedagogy, piano performance/technique and piano repertoire. Various pedagogical techniques and learning theories will be discussed with the primary focus on beginning level students in both private and group settings. The course will also survey current piano methods and investigate approaches to teaching technique, theory, sight reading, improvisation, and the business aspects of studio teaching. The performance component will focus on technical development, physical awareness, performance anxiety, memorization and style interpretation. Piano literature from the four principle style periods will be discussed and analyzed from a performance perspective. This will include both concert repertoire and teaching repertoire. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and permission of instructor.

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MUSC 345 - Methods of Teaching Music in Elementary School

A preparation for teaching music in the primary and intermediate grades. Activities for singing, rhythm, listening, body movement and creative activities, with emphasis on curriculum development and lesson planning. For Music major and minors only. Students must complete 20 hours of observation/teaching in an assigned field experience.

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MUSC 437 - Conducting I

The techniques and skills of communication via gesture are explored in this skill-oriented course. Application will focus on concise techniques, use of right and left hand, cueing, phrasing, negation, gesture of syncopation, and releases. Students who are not music majors or minor should obtain the consent of the instructor before registering for the course.

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MUSC 438 - Conducting II

Following successful completion of MUSC 437, this course is a continuation and development of choral musicianship through conducting and study of choral literature. The addition of active and passive gestures as well as left hand fluency will be emphasized in this course. In-class conduction of recitatives, anthems, and other literature serves to integrate and apply skills. Prerequisite: MUSC 437

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MUSC 439 - Choral Procedures

Following successful completion of MUSC 438, lectures and discussion will center around the choral rehearsal. Error detection, problem-solving and sound refinement are the critical skills to be developed. It is intended and desired that a laboratory choir be found to facilitate hands-on learning. It is the marriage of these new skills to the basic conducting skills learned in previous semesters that constitute the ultimate goal of this class. Prerequisite: MUSC 438 and permission of instructor

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MUSC 440 - Methods of Teaching Music in Secondary School

A comprehensive course dealing with teaching learning systems, materials, curriculum development, and lesson planning in junior high and high school music programs. Students must complete 20 hours of observation/teaching in an assigned field experience. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

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MUSC 450 - Applied Organ Lessons II

An additional fee is charged for private lessons in organ, piano and voice. Class instruction in piano and voice are offered for students with little or no background.

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MUSC 455 - Applied Piano Lessons II

An additional fee is charged for private lessons in organ, piano and voice. Class instruction in piano and voice are offered for students with little or no background.

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MUSC 460 - Applied Voice Lessons II

An additional fee is charged for private lessons in organ, piano and voice. Class instruction in piano and voice are offered for students with little or no background.

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MUSC 48M - Chamber Choir

Various performance opportunities are offered to all students by the music department. Participation in all groups is decided by audition or permission of instructor.

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MUSC 50M - Cliff Singers

Various performance opportunities are offered to all students by the music department. Participation in all groups is decided by audition or permission of instructor.

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MUSC 55M - Jazz Ensemble

Various performance opportunities are offered to all students by the music department. Participation in all groups is decided by audition or permission of instructor.

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MUSC IS - Independent Study

Accompanying; Conducting; Vocal Pedagogy; Diction: German, French, Italian; Opera Workshop; European Experience; Music Technology (required); Senior Recital or Senior Project (required).

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NURS 205 - Foundational Nursing Concepts

Foundational Nursing Concepts provides an introduction to the scientific and theoretical concepts in nursing practice. Concepts: Health, Patient-Profile, Professional Nursing, and Health Care Concepts of the individual will be introduced.

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NURS 210 - Concepts for Beginning Nursing Practice

This course provides the initial theoretical basis for the application of the nursing process in caring for the individual across the life-span.

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NURS 215 - Systems and Processes in Nursing

Provides an introduction to the scientific and theoretical bases of nursing practice. Psychological, physiological, developmental, sociocultural, spiritual and ethical dimensions of the client system are incorporated into the nursing process. Laboratory experiences provide opportunity to develop beginning skills in nursing care of the individual client system. Prerequisite: admission to the major, BIOL 221 and 222, CHEM 109 Concurrent: BIOL 239, BIOL 240 Fees: Lab - $150, Organizational - $35, Testing - $150

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NURS 220 - Health Assessment

An introductory course in nursing health assessment. Students will be presented with knowledge, and skills applicable to the practice of professional nursing. The emphasis of the course will be on the relationship between the nursing process and health assessment skills at various stages of life span development. Prerequisite: BIOL 221, BIOL 222, CHEM 109 Concurrent: BIOL 240, BIOL 239 Fees: Lab - $150

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NURS 230 - Nursing Care of the Adult Client I

Provides the initial theoretical basis for the application of the nursing process in caring for the adult client with actual or potential quality of life and health issues. Clinical experiences in the acute, long-term, or community-based settings provide the student an opportunity to apply the nursing process. Prerequisite: NURS 220, NURS 215 Concurrent: NURS 250, BIOL 340, PSYC 280 Fees: Lab - $150

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NURS 240 - Concepts for Reproduction and Sexuality

This course provides the theoretical basis for the concepts of reproduction and sexuality.

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NURS 250 - Pharmacology

Focuses on nursing pharmacology and therapeutics by presenting a theoretical foundation and practical approach to drug therapy and application in many settings. The course reviews general principles, theories, and facts about drugs and administration practices. Prerequisite: NURS 220, NURS 215 Concurrent: NURS 230, BIOL 340, PSYC 280 Fees: Lab - $150

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NURS 300 - Evidence-based Nursing Practice

Enhances the student's knowledge of evidence-based practice. The student is introduced to research and research utilization processes. Emphasis is on the knowledge and skills required to critically evaluate and apply qualitative and quantitative research to improve quality of care. Students have the opportunity to apply the knowledge/skills through the development of evidence-based practice changes. The student is exposed to process of grant writing. Prerequisite: NURS 335 (basic students), NURS 310 (RN-BSN students), MATH 200 Concurrent: NURS 330 & 340 (basic students)

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NURS 310 - Theoretical Bases for Nursing Practice (RN-BSN only)

Designed as a bridge course to orient the registered nurse to Upper Division study. Nursing theories are evaluated in the context of the theory-practice relationship. Opportunity is provided for in-depth understanding of the nursing process. Specific concepts relevant to professional nursing practice are considered and applied in analysis of both practice and education issues. Students apply these theories as a framework to guide nursing care of client systems. Initial validation of skills and initial written and oral communication competencies are addressed. Prerequisite: RN licensure

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NURS 311 - Professional Writing for Nurses

This course fosters the development of research and citation skills through the use and application of advanced research techniques.

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NURS 320 - Health Assessment for Registered Nurses (RN-BSN only)

Provides opportunity for the student to expand upon current knowledge and skills applicable to the practice of health assessment in professional nursing. The emphasis of the course will be on the relationship between the nursing process and health assessment skills at various stages of life span development. Prerequisite: RN licensure Fees: Lab - $75

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NURS 330 - Nursing Care of the Childbearing/Childrearing Family

Provides the theoretical basis for application of the nursing process in providing care to the family during childbearing and childrearing period. Clinical experiences in acute care and community based settings provide an opportunity for the student to apply the nursing process to normal and high-risk childbearing families, infants, children, and adolescents. Prerequisite: NURS 335 and 355 Concurrent: NURS 305, NURS 340 Fees: Lab - $150

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NURS 335 - Nursing Care of the Adult Client II

Provides a continuation of theoretical basis for the application of the nursing process in caring for the adult client with actual or potential quality of life and health issues. Clinical experiences in the acute care setting provide the student an opportunity to build critical thinking skills in the application of the nursing process. Prerequisite: NURS 230 and 250 Concurrent: PSYC 360, MATH 200 Fees: Lab - $150, Testing - $150, Organizational - $70

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NURS 340 - Nursing Care of Clients with Acute Mental Health Issues

Introduces the therapeutic use of self as an intervention in assisting the client in attaining stability in the acute mental health setting. Clinical experiences in the acute mental health settings, and selected supervised clinical observations, provide an opportunity for the student to critically think while analyzing nursing interventions options. The nursing process is further utilized to guide interventions and priority setting for the acutely ill client in the mental health setting. Prerequisite: NURS 335 and 355, PSYC 360 Concurrent: NURS 305 and 330 Fees: Lab - $75

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NURS 355 - Nursing Care of Clients in Acute and Critical Settings

NURS 355 Nursing Care of Clients in Acute and Critical Settings 3 sem. Hours This course expands the theoretical bases for application of the nursing process when caring for the critically ill adult client with actual and potential quality of life and health issues. Clinical experiences in the acute and critical care settings, and selected supervised clinical observations, provide an opportunity for the student to critically think while analyzing nursing interventions options. Prerequisite: NURS 230, 250 Concurrent: NURS 355 Fees: Lab - $150

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NURS 356 - Biological and Health Aspects of Aging

NURS 360 - Concepts for Intermediate Nursing Practice I

This course focuses on the enhanced application of the nursing process in caring for the individual across the life-span.

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NURS 365 - Pediatric Growth and Development

This course focuses on the concepts of growth and development. Didactic and clinical experiences emphasize the stages of pediatric development.

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NURS 370 - Concepts for Intermediate Nursing Practice II

This course focuses on the enhanced application of the nursing process in caring for the individual across the life-span.

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NURS 380 - Nursing Practice in the Community

This course focuses on applying nursing concepts to promote, preserve and maintain population health. Didactic and clinical experiences immerse the learner in a variety of population health settings.

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NURS 400 - Psychosocial Concepts of Nursing Practice

This course focuses on the enhanced application of the nursing process in caring for the individual across the life-span. Didactic and clinical experiences focus on therapeutic communication, the provision of nursing practice, and the use of pharmacological agents related to the psychosocial aspects of the concepts within: Health, Patient-Profile, Professional Nursing, and Health Care.

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NURS 405 - Nursing Process in the Community

Provides for utilization of the levels of prevention as intervention to assist the family client system to promote, restore, and maintain stability.

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NURS 429 - Community and Public Health Nursing Science I

The first course in the community and public health sequence synthesizes the concepts of nursing, human, and public health science and is integrated with the art of nursing. With an emphasis on the application of the nursing process with culturally diverse individuals and families within the community, the course provides for the exploration and utilization of all levels of prevention to foster the promotion, restoration, and maintenance of community health. Clinical experiences in a variety of community settings will provide an opportunity for students to investigate the physiological, psychological, developmental, sociocultural, spiritual, and ethical dimensions which affect the health of the community. Prerequisite: NURS 330 and 340 (basic students); NURS 310 and 320 (RN-BSN students) Concurrent: NURS 440 (basic students) Fees: Lab- $150

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NURS 435 - Nursing Leadership in the Health Care Delivery System

Explores theories and concepts of decision making, leadership, management and the change process in relationship to the application of the nursing process in various health care settings. Included is the connection of personal, professional, and organizational values and ethics to the identification of options and alternatives in leadership and management in the health care system. Health care policy is discussed and contemporary health care issues are critically evaluated as they relate to the health needs of the societal system and the practice of professional nursing. The clinical component provides an opportunity for students to experience (a) the role played by a nurse leader/manager and/or (b) engage in a leadership change project. Prerequisite: NURS 440, 455, and 410 (Basic); NURS 455 (RN-BSN) Concurrent: NURS 465, NURS 475 and 445 (Basic)

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NURS 440 - Nursing Care of Clients with Chronic Mental Health Issues

Enhance the therapeutic use of self as an intervention in assisting the client in attaining stability in the long term and community mental health settings. Clinical experiences in a variety of long- term or community mental health settings including selected supervised clinical observations, provide an opportunity for the student to critically think while analyzing nursing intervention options and treatment modalities for clients in these settings. The nursing process is further utilized to guide interventions and priority setting for the clients in the long-term or community mental health setting. Prerequisite: NURS 305, 330, 340 Concurrent: NURS 410 and 455 Fees: Lab - $75, Testing $150

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NURS 445 - Nursing Care of the Complex Client

This course expands the theoretical basis for application of the nursing process in providing care for the adult client experiencing multi system disorders. Experiences in various health care settings, including a clinical experience, provide an opportunity for the student to apply all levels of prevention as interventions to complex system disruption resulting from internal and external environmental forces. Prerequisite: NURS 410, 440, 455 Concurrent: NURS 435, 465, and 475 Fees: Lab- $150

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NURS 455 - Community and Public Health Nursing Science II

The second course in the community and public health sequence synthesizes the concepts of nursing, human, and public health science and is integrated with the art of nursing. With an emphasis on the application of the nursing process with culturally diverse groups within the community, the course provides for the exploration and utilization of all levels of prevention to foster the promotion, restoration, and maintenance of community health. Clinical experiences in a variety of community settings will provide an opportunity for students to investigate the physiological, psychological, developmental, sociocultural, spiritual, and ethical dimensions which affect the health of the community. Prerequisite: NURS 340 and 330 (basic students) Concurrent: NURS 410 (basic students and RN-BSN students) Fees: Lab- $75

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NURS 460 - Nursing Leadership & Management

This course focuses on theories and concepts of clinical decision making, leadership, management, and the change process in relationship to the application of the nursing process in various health care settings. Didactic and clinical experiences emphasize Professional Nursing and Health Care concepts

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NURS 465 - Nursing Preceptorship Experience

As the final course in preparation for nursing practice, Nursing 465 facilitates a smooth transition from student to registered nurse in the clinical setting. This course fosters growth and development of the student by encouraging the integration and utilization of knowledge gained from all disciplines of the liberal arts, baccalaureate education. The knowledge gained through the various courses specific to nursing will be particularly utilized as the student continues to critically think while assuming responsibilities congruent with the role of the registered nurse in prioritizing and delivering quality, compassionate care for a group of clients. Prerequisite: NURS 410, 440, 455 Concurrent: NURS 435, 445, 475 Fees: Lab - $150

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NURS 475 - Transition into Professional Nursing

Provides graduating basic and L.P.N.-B.S.N. seniors an opportunity to prepare for securing their first professional nursing position, writing the NCLEX examination, and practicing in their first nursing position. Emphasis is placed on life-long learning, personal and professional development, leadership, and integrating values and ethics in decision making. Prerequisite: NURS 410, 440, 455 Concurrent: NURS 435, 445 and 465

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NURS 480 - Concepts for Complex Nursing Practice

This course focuses on the enhanced application of the nursing process in caring for the individual across the life-span. Didactic and clinical experiences expand on the provision of nursing practice and the use of pharmacological agents related to the complex and interrelated aspects of the concepts within: Health, Patient-Profile, Professional Nursing, and Health Care.

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NURS 501 - Theoretical Foundations For Advanced Nursing Practice

Focuses on philosophical and theoretical foundations of advanced nursing practice. An emphasis is placed on concepts, conceptual models, and theories as they have developed in nursing, as well as theoretical foundations from related disciplines. The relationships between theory, research and clinical practice is analyzed. Ethical, cultural, legal and political issues and their impact on the profession and the delivery of health care are discussed from a variety of perspectives. Graduates are prepared to wholistically care for a variety of clients incorporating a theory basis for their practice.

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NURS 510 - Heath Care System: Paradigms, Policy And Ethics

This course surveys the current health care milieu from both a national and global perspective. Particular consideration of governmental/legal, fiscal and society values and philosophies, spiritual, moral/ethical issues will unfold the current context of health care delivery. In depth analysis focuses on health care organizations, ethics, financing and public policy, and the associated role of the advanced practice nurse in light of the social contact with the public, and opportunities to advocate for social justice and healthy environments.

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NURS 520 - Foundations Of Advanced Nursing Practice

Students have the opportunity to prepare for practice as an advanced practice registered nurse. Didactic experiences focus on the complex dynamics and issues encountered in clinical practice, education and administration as well as the attendant ethical and legal issues. Students develop knowledge and competencies to practice collaboratively with other health care providers, assume leadership for wholistic client care and advocacy for clients and the public. The practicum focuses on initial practice in the advanced practice roles as an educator, researcher, advocate, clinician, consultant, collaborator, and systems manager.

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NURS 529 - Research Methods for Advanced Practice Nursing

Focuses on methods of inquiry as a basis for the expansion of nursing knowledge and application of research in advanced clinical practice. Selection of research methods to identify client-focused clinical nursing problems and appropriate interventions in advanced practice are addressed within an ethical context.

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NURS 530 - Nursing Science I

Focuses on methods of inquiry as a basis for the expansion of nursing knowledge and application of research in advanced clinical practice. Selection of research methods to identify client-focused clinical nursing problems and appropriate interventions in advanced practice are addressed within an ethical context. The course provides a basis for evaluation of published research, supports application of formalized quantitative methods to practice, and prepares the graduate to practice evidence-based practice and conduct quantitative research studies. Epidemiological trends will be addressed as one of the methods utilized for identification of client related problems. Analysis of research studies; and the identification of a specific research problem in nursing, a specific research design, and the development of a research proposal are expected outcomes of this course.

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NURS 535 - Nursing Research

Focuses on methods of inquiry as a basis for the expansion of nursing knowledge and application of research in nursing education. Selection of research methods to identify nursing education problems are addressed within an ethical context. The course provides a basis for evaluation of published research, supports application of formalized quantitative and qualitative methods, and prepares the graduate to conduct research studies and incorporate evidence based practice into their role as nurse educators. Analysis of research studies, the identification of specific research problems in nursing education, and the development of a research proposal are expected outcomes of this course.

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NURS 540 - Nursing Science II

Focuses on methods of inquiry as a basis for the expansion of nursing knowledge and application of research in advanced clinical practice. Selection of research methods to identify client-focused clinical nursing problems and appropriate interventions in advanced practice are addressed within an ethical context. The course provides a basis for evaluation of published research, supports application of formalized qualitative methods to practice, and prepares the graduate to conduct qualitative research studies. The course provides a basis for evaluation of published research, and supports application of formalized qualitative methods to practice. Epidemiological trends will be addressed as one of the methods utilized for identification of client related problems. Analysis of research studies; and the identification of a specific research problem in nursing, a specific research design, and the development of a research proposal are expected outcomes of this two-course sequence.

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NURS 560 - Advanced Health Assessment

This course focuses on the expansion and refinement of the clinician’s skills in collecting and integrating wholistic data necessary for a comprehensive health assessment, including functional assessment, health history, physical examination and indicated diagnostic testing. It is designed to strengthen the physical, psychological, social-cultural, developmental and spiritual assessment throughout the lifespan. Laboratory and clinical experiences in advanced practice skills are used to emphasize the differentiation between normal and abnormal findings. The enhancement of wholistic assessment skills is intended to serve as the basis for ensuring appropriate and effective clinical decision-making in advanced practice.

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NURS 570 - Advanced Pharmacology

This course presents advanced principles of pharmacology, including both the pharmacotherapeutics and pharmacokinetics of selected drug groups and their clinical application. It is designed to build upon the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of disease processes and wholistic health assessment, and to provide the foundation for clinical competency in therapeutic drug prescription and administration. Emphasis is placed on developing knowledge and aptitudes in safely and effectively assessing, diagnosing, and treating common health alterations, and the related professional, ethical and legal issues in prescriptive practice. Synthesis and application of pharmacological principles will also be integrated within the clinical practice experience.

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NURS 580 - Theoretical Foundations in Higher Education

This course examines the structural characteristics, dynamics and functions of the social institution of higher education in the American study of the context of higher education focuses on the historical, political, legal, economic, socio-cultural, religious and technologic factors that have shaped and continue to influence the American higher educational experience. The course focuses on character development/ethics in teaching, cognitive development/learning theories, and roles of academician.

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NURS 590 - Curriculum and Instruction

In this course, students study the historic, present, and anticipated context of curriculum development in nursing, and the related diverse pedagogical and andragogical approaches to nursing education. Emphasis is devoted to curricular development, planning, implementation and evaluation within associate degree and baccalaureate degree nursing programs. The clinical experience focuses on development, planning and evaluating curricula.

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NURS 610 - Levels of Prevention and The Young Family

This course explores utilization of all levels of prevention with a focus on primary health care delivery, and primary and secondary prevention: health promotion, risk screening, and disease prevention with the child-bearing and child-rearing family. Current research and epidemiological trends in health care are explored and serve as the foundation for application of clinical decision making in advanced practice roles. Within a context of values and ethics, this course provides opportunity for discussion, differentiation, and application of the concepts related to various clinical practice roles. Laboratory and clinical experiences allow students to apply theory and research in diagnosing and treating common health concerns seen in primary care, and emphasizes promotion of the client’s wholistic health. (Student must meet with the clinical faculty during the term preceding their enrollment to arrange for the clinical component of this course).

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NURS 615 - Levels of Prevention and The Family

This course explores utilization of all levels of prevention with a focus on primary health care delivery and primary and secondary prevention with the mid-life family: health promotion, risk screening, disease prevention, and diagnosis and early treatment of health alterations. Theory and clinical experiences focus on students’ use of diagnostic reasoning skills to diagnose and treat common health concerns seen in primary care. Current research and epidemiological trends in health care are explored and serve as the foundation for application of clinical decision making in advanced practice roles. Within a context of values and ethics, this course provides opportunity for discussion, differentiation, and application of the concepts related to various clinical practice roles. Laboratory and clinical experiences allow students to apply theory and research in diagnosing and treating common health concerns seen in primary care, and emphasizes promotion and restoration of the client’s wholistic health. (Student must meet with the clinical faculty during the term preceding their enrollment to arrange for the clinical component of this course).

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NURS 621 - Evidence Based Practice I

This course offers the opportunity to develop and/or revise nursing clinical practice or protocols based on scientific rigorous empirical and qualitative evidence. Includes actual implementation of the proposed change.

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NURS 622 - Evidence Based Practice II

A continuation of NURS 621

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NURS 630 - Levels of Prevention and The Older Family

This course explores utilization of all levels of prevention with a focus on primary health care delivery and secondary and tertiary prevention with the older-adult family: diagnosis and early treatment of health alterations and reduction of complications and health maintenance. Both theory and clinical experiences focus on students’ use of diagnostic reasoning skills to diagnose and treat common health concerns seen in gerontologic-based primary care. Current research and epidemiological trends in health care are explored and serve as the foundation for application of clinical decision making in advanced practice roles. Within a context of values and ethics, this course provides opportunity for discussion, differentiation, and application of the concepts related to various clinical practice roles. Laboratory and clinical experiences allow students to apply theory and research in diagnosing and treating common health concerns seen in primary care, and emphasizes restoration and maintenance of the client’s wholistic health. (Student must meet with the clinical faculty during the term preceding their enrollment to arrange for the clinical component of this course).

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NURS 631 - Advanced Health Assessment

This course focuses on the expansion and refinement of the clinician’s skills in collecting and integrating wholistic data necessary for a comprehensive health assessment, including functional assessment, recognition of medical genetics conditions, health history, physical examination and indicated lab and diagnostic testing.

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NURS 632 - Advanced Practice Skills Lab

This laboratory course focuses on the competencies of technical clinical skills for advanced practice.

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NURS 640 - FNP Practicum

This course sequence is specific to the FNP option. NURS 640 and 641 are designed to provide a minimum of 600 hours of clinical practice in order to meet eligibility for the certification examination. Students identify and make arrangements with a MSN prepared NP or an appropriate designee for clinical practice with young, mid-life, or older families. Students enrolled in this clinical practicum will be expected to integrate values and ethics and apply the theories and concepts of the NP role in clinical practice with families throughout the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on comprehensive assessment, management, and evaluation of health care needs of the adults and children within a family system. As the culminating course for the Family Nurse Practitioner Role Preparation, this seminar will ask students to examine their role as health care providers and show how they have been influenced by their course of studies.

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NURS 641 - FNP Practicum II

This course is specific to the FNP option and is a continuation of NURS 640.

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NURS 645 - Advanced Pharmacology

This course presents advanced principles of pharmacology, including both the pharmacotherapeutics and pharmacokinetics/dynamics of selected drug groups and their clinical application.

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NURS 660 - Teaching and Evaluating Learning in Colleges of Nursing (Theory Based)

This course considers educational theories and practices currently influencing teaching, including contrasting frameworks of motivation and learning, learning and thinking styles, and models of teaching. A critical analysis of the research and practices in the use of instructional technology in higher education will be covered. The 40-hour clinical focuses on developing teaching strategies for the reflective nurse educator with emphasis on theories of learning, ethics, planning course units and teaching sessions, learning styles, teaching approaches that promote critical thinking, and evaluation processes.

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NURS 665 - Teaching and Evaluating Learning in Colleges of Nursing (Clinical Based)

This course considers educational theories and practices currently influencing clinical teaching, including contrasting frameworks of motivation and learning, acquisition of clinical aptitudes, models of teaching, and clinical scholarship. A critical analysis of the research and practices in the development of excellent clinical practice is emphasized. The 40-hour clinical focuses on developing teaching strategies for the reflective nurse educator with emphasis on theories of learning, ethics, planning clinical teaching sessions, approaches that promote critical thinking, development of clinical aptitudes, and evaluation techniques.

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NURS 671 - Teaching in Colleges of Nursing Practicum I

This is the culminating course for the Nurse Educator Master’s sequence. In the seminar component students will examine their role as educational colleagues and leaders, how they have been influenced by their course of studies, and have integrated values and ethics. The presentation of the electronic portfolio will demonstrate how the student has incorporated knowledge gained from the program and put into practice at educational sites. Participation in the exit interview will complete the requirements of the Seminar component. The 160-hour student teaching clinical focuses on developing and implementing teaching-learning strategies for the nurse educator with emphasis on theories of learning, ethics, planning course units and teaching-learning sessions, learning styles, integrating teaching approaches that promote critical thinking, the integration of instructional technology, and evaluation of learning and program effectiveness.

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NURS 672 - Teaching in Colleges of Nursing Practicum II

This course is specific to the Educator track and is a continuation of NURS 671

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NURS 675 - Cultural Competence in Health Care

This course will increase the student’s awareness regarding the dimensions and complexities involved in caring for people from diverse cultural backgrounds. The issues of health care delivery will be explored and contrasted with the choices that people must make when attempting to deal with health care issues.

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NURS 710 - Primary Care in Pediatrics

This course explores utilization of all levels of prevention with a focus on primary health care delivery, and secondary and tertiary prevention with the younger family and includes diagnosis and early treatment of health alterations and reduction of complications and health maintenance

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NURS 715 - Primary Care of the Adult I

This course explores utilization of all levels of prevention with a focus on primary health care delivery and primary and secondary prevention with the mid-life family: health promotion, risk screening, disease prevention, and diagnosis and early treatment of health alterations.

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NURS 730 - Primary Care of the Adult II

This course explores utilization of all levels of prevention with a focus on primary health care delivery and secondary and tertiary prevention with the older-adult family: diagnosis and early treatment of health alterations and reduction of complications and health maintenance.

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NURS 735 - Primary Care of the Elderly

NURS 740 - FNP Practicum I

The FNP Practicum is designed to provide the first 120 of the DNP goal of 540 hours of practicum practice in order to meet eligibility for the certification examination.

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NURS 741 - FNP Practicum II

The practicum is designed to provide the second 120 hours of practicum practice in order to meet eligibility for the certification examination.

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NURS 742 - FNP Practicum III

This practicum is designed to provide the third 120 hours of practice in order to meet eligibility for the certification examination.

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NURS 743 - FNP Practicum IV

This practicum is designed to provide the final 180 of the total 540 hours of practicum practice in order to meet eligibility for the certification examination.

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NURS 750 - Transformational Leadership

This course provides an analysis of effective and efficient methods of providing leadership in the nursing profession. Discussion of a variety of situations that the nursing leader negotiates with regard to strategic planning, program and facility development, budget preparation, fund raising, program evaluation, and the accreditation process.

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NURS 760 - Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Throughout the Lifespan

Provides a basis for advanced practice nursing through the exploration of the human health experience of clients across healthcare settings. Emphasizes health promotion, acute episodic care, and chronic community based care within a human caring framework. Focuses on the use of current research to direct advanced practice nursing skills and care.

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NURS 835 - Ethical Issues Influencing Practice and Research in Health Disparities

This course is an in-depth critical analysis of ethical dimensions encompassing health care, politics, policy, medicine, research, and clinical practice. Interdisciplinary perspectives are utilized to synthesize ethical positions and viewpoints on health-related issues for individuals, groups, and populations in contemporary society.

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NURS 850 - Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations for Evidence Based Care

This course will prepare the student to analyze significant practice issues with the theoretical and scientific underpinnings of knowledge-based practice. The student will employ advanced clinical judgment to assess the evidence from nursing theories and models, interdisciplinary theories, research findings, and value systems of clients.

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NURS 855 - Translational Research in Healthcare

DNP students will critique the quality of evidence derived from quantitative and qualitative research. Students will determine how evidence derived from research will guide advanced practice and inform quality care for diverse populations, including the rural or underserved. Implications for new advanced nursing practice models based on research and culturally congruent policies and practices to improve care will be explored.

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NURS 860 - Health Operations & Financial Management for Nurse Leaders

This course focuses on business skills needed by the nurse executive or advance practice nurse to lead, influence, and develop healthcare delivery systems. Principles of financial management, healthcare economics, human resource and productivity management, strategic management, marketing, and information management and their application to healthcare delivery systems will be examined. Students will apply these business skills to selected specialty areas.

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NURS 865 - DNP Capstone

This capstone experience provides the DNP student with opportunity to apply theoretical concepts and research evidence to advanced nursing practice focused on quality health care with rural or underserved populations. Within the seminar, students will compare and contrast models of care delivery and organizational systems.

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NURS 870 - DNP Practice Innovation Project

OSSC 008A - Reading and Critical Thinking

This course is designed to improve a student's skills in the areas of reading, comprehension and vocabulary to the levels needed to meet the reading demands of college-level courses and to make reading enjoyable. Through the use of text and video materials, discussions and exercises, and conferences with students, the following areas will be covered: identifying main idea, supporting detail and sequence of events, locating facts, using context clues, drawing conclusions, identifying persuasion, making accurate inferences and identifying figurative language.

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OSSC 009M - College Survival and Study Skills

This course is designed to provide instruction on strategies that increase academic success at a university and to give students an opportunity to use the strategies. Strategies for managing time, listening and concentration, note taking, previewing and marking a textbook, memorizing information, preparing for and taking tests, writing a short essay and more will be presented in this course.

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OSSC 010M - Transitions

This course is intended to offer first-year student athletes a foundation on which to build their college experience. Emphasis will be placed on the skills needed for athletes to effectively take advantage of the first year college experience. Topics will include: communication, stress management, eligibility, academic and student life polices, character development, and building effective relationships.

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OSSC 015M - College Strengths and Effectiveness

This course is designed to help students achieve academic success at Briar Cliff University. Through a variety of readings, activities, discussions and hands-on experiences, students discover ways to stay on course, become more focused, and develop habits, skills and strategies that lead toward greater success in the classroom.

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OSSC 101M - Academic Success Bridge Program

This course is an on-campus experience which allows first-year students to experience the academic environment at Briar Cliff University. Through structured academic and integrated co- curricular activities this course will teach students how to be better prepared to bridge the gap between high school preparation and college readiness demands.

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OSSC 102M - College Preparatory Instruction

This course is designed to engage students with integrating writing and reading in tandem. Students will identify their goals, personal strengths, areas for development, and familiarity with academic resources available on campus to prepare for college-level writing, reading and research.

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PENG 108 - Engineering Problems

Development of skills and orderly methods of solving problems. Emphasis is on mathematical techniques.

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PENG 122 - Engineering Graphics

A study of the principles of engineering drawing and design. Includes lettering, orthographic projection, sections, pictorial systems, dimensioning, fasteners, computer- assisted drawing and creative design.

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PHIL 100 - Introduction to Philosophy

An introductory course that surveys representative ancient, medieval and modern philosophers (including Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Soren Kierkegaard) in their historical context. In this process, students are also introduced to some key philosophical ideas.

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PHIL 110 - Logical Thinking

An introduction to principles of good reasoning. Shows how to assess arguments, how to formulate cogent arguments and how to recognize and avoid logical fallacies.

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PHIL 175 - Independent Philsophy Study

Directed study of philosophical topics. Open to students with previous background in philosophy or to otherwise qualified students. With departmental approval

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PHIL 210 - Ethics

Looks at several ethical theories that shape how people think ethically. Then examines various human behaviors, individual and social, from a moral viewpoint. Focuses on arguments for moral positions. Prerequisite: Sophomore status

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PHIL 212 - Ethics in Business and Society

Application of philosophical method to understanding ethical issues in business, including civil liberties in the workplace, obligations to the firm and to third parties, employment discrimination, sexual harassment, product safety, environmental protection, corporate responsibility, economic justice and black markets. Prerequisite: 20 hours of college course work or instructor approval

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PHIL 215 - Philosophy in Film, Literature and Art

Aesthetic exploration of philosophical ideas. Utilizes philosophical discourse and imaginative narrative to examine such issues as reality, human nature, free will, the mind, ethics and God.

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PHIL 220 - Philosophy of Religion

Philosophical treatment of a number of topics relative to God and religion, including: arguments for the existence of God, the problem of evil, faith and reason, religious experience, death and human destiny. Prerequisite: Sophomore status

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PHIL 275 - Independent Philosophy Study II

Directed study of philosophical topics. Open to students with previous background in philosophy or to otherwise qualified students. With departmental approval

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PHIL 300 - History of Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval

PHIL 300 History of Philosophy: Ancient and Medieval 3 sem. hrs. Survey of ideas from the history of ancient and medieval philosophy. Primary focus on Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas. Examines influential philosophical views on ethics, self, world and God. Prerequisite: Previous coursework in philosophy or instructor approval

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PHIL 310 - History of Philosophy: Modern

Survey of ideas from the history of modern philosophy, from Descartes through Nietzsche. Examines influential philosophical views on ethics, self, world and God. Prerequisite: Previous coursework in philosophy or instructor approval

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PHIL 320 - Philsophy of Law

This course focuses on three major interrelated areas in the philosophical approach to understanding law: the nature of law, including philosophical justifications and explanations of law and the relation between law and morality; processes of legal reasoning; and, important court cases showing applications of philosophy, philosophical ethics, and logic to various important legal and ethical issues.

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PHIL 375 - Independent Philosophy Study III

Directed study of philosophical topics. Open to students with previous background in philosophy or to otherwise qualified students. With departmental approval

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PHIL 410 - Metaphysics

Idealism and materialism; substance, change and personal identity; freedom and determinism; causality and God as first cause of being.

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PHIL 475 - Independent Philosophy Study IV

Directed study of philosophical topics. Open to students with previous background in philosophy or to otherwise qualified students. With departmental approval

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PHIL IR - Philosophy Independent Research

Directed research in specific areas in philosophy, in response to special interest or needs of the students.

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PHYS 107 - Astronomy

A descriptive astronomy course at a low mathematical level. Recommended for non-science majors. Topics covered include the motion of the stars and planets, the solar system, tools and methods of astronomy, stars, stellar evolution, galaxies, and cosmology. Three lectures, no lab.

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PHYS 116 - Physical Science

A survey of physical science with emphasis on physics, chemistry and earth science. Arithmetic and simple algebra are used throughout the course. Required for elementary education majors, but open to all students. Not recommended for science majors. Three lectures, one lab.

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PHYS 121 - Basic Physics I

An introductory physics course for students of moderate mathematical ability. Topics include vectors, motion, force, energy, momentum, mechanical waves, oscillations, fluids and thermal physics. Recommended for pre-medics, pre-dental, biology majors, psychology majors, medical technologists and liberal arts students interested in science. An elementary understanding of algebra and trigonometry is required. Three lectures, one lab.

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PHYS 122 - Basic Physics II

A continuation of PHYS 121. Topics include electricity, magnetism, circuits, optics, relativity, quantum physics, atomic physics and nuclear physics. Three lectures, one lab. Prerequisite: PHYS 121

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PHYS 175 - Independent Physics Study

Open to qualified students who wish to engage in directed study in a selected area. With departmental approval

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PHYS 231 - College Physics I

An introductory physics course for students who know calculus. Topics include vectors, motion, A force, energy, momentum, mechanical waves and fluids. Highly recommended for all secondary science teachers, mathematics majors, chemistry majors, pre-engineers and science students who plan graduate study. Three lectures, one lab. Prerequisite: MATH 218

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PHYS 232 - College Physics II

A continuation of PHYS 231. Topics include thermal physics, electricity, magnetism, circuits, geometrical optics and physical optics. Three lectures, one lab. Prerequisite: PHYS 231

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PHYS 275 - Independent Physics Study II

Open to qualified students who wish to engage in directed study in a selected area. With departmental approval

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PHYS 375 - Independent Physics Study III

Open to qualified students who wish to engage in directed study in a selected area. With departmental approval

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PHYS 475 - Independent Physics Study IV

Open to qualified students who wish to engage in directed study in a selected area. With departmental approval

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PSCI 101 - American Government

This course covers the basic elements of politics and government at the national level in the United States. It examines the structures, processes, behaviors, institutions, and policies of the American system with a relative emphasis on conflicting theories of power. By the end of the semester, students should have a solid understanding of how the system operates in addition to a comprehension of some of the key issues that face the country today.

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PSCI 224 - Geography and World Cultures

A survey of human cultures within their physical and social environments. The course reviews basic physical geography and examines major cultural regions and problems in the modern world. Understanding both of global social organization and of the ever-changing position of the United States within the international community is a major emphasis.

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PSCI 243 - State and Local Government

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the nature, function and structure of government at the state and local levels. The approach used in the course combines a structural and functional view of government. It also addresses different theoretical perspectives relative to state and local government. Some of the topics to be discussed include: the policy making environment, public policy making structures, political parties, interest groups, forms of local government and issues of contemporary public policy.

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PSCI 245 - Constitutional Law

An introduction to the study of constitutional law. A study of the interpretation of the federal constitution through leading decisions of the Supreme Court.

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PSCI 264 - Politics of Film

Popular culture, as expressed in music, journalism, or film, offers valuable insights into the political character of a nation. As a business, popular entertainment is marketed to a wide audience. As such, it must appeal to, embody and reflect, the tastes, preference, and political sensibilities of its audience. This is why we can learn a great deal about the political ideas of a particular time and place by carefully analyzing the various forms of popular entertainment. This course focuses on one of the most important forms of modern entertainment-film. Not only do popular films reflect prevailing political feelings, it simultaneously reinforces and shapes them. Whether this politicization of film is done deliberately or by accident, film ultimately projects American's fear, anxieties, political preferences, hopes, dreams, and ambitions.

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PSCI 284 - Comparative Politics

This course is designed to acquaint students with many standard concepts used to analyze governments and politics within the field of comparative politics. In addition to introducing comparative concepts, the course provides information on the political systems of several modern-nation states. At the completion of this course, students should be able to combine factual material with abstract concepts in order to explain the basic politics and government of the nation-states covered in this course.

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PSCI 300 - African Politics

The goal of this course is to introduce you to African politics and society from the perspective of a political scientist. To do this, we will cover a good deal of history from the pre-colonial period to the present day. The approach will be thematic, using a comparative method that will pay particular attention to a handful of countries that embody the successes and challenges facing Africa's political development. By the end of the semester you will have a better understanding of African politics and society, how political scientists approach political development in this corner of the world, and become more interested in international affairs in our shrinking world.

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PSCI 303 - Congress and the Presidency

This course systematically explores several questions about our two preeminent political institutions; the Presidency and the Congress. We will carefully consider the constitutional powers of the Presidency, examine how the power of the office changed over time, and consider the nature of the Presidential leadership. We will also examine the structures and powers of Congress, its historical evolution, and the policy making process. We will also examine the relationship between the two branches and the electoral process.

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PSCI 318 - The Elections

This course will systematically explore the current election in general election years. We will carefully examine the primary process, the general election campaign, the critical issues that are defining and framing the election, and ultimately discuss the election outcome. This is all done from the perspective of political scientists in a way that applies empirical and formal political theory into practice.

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PSCI 321 - Mock Trial

An introduction to the litigation process. The course will begin with an introduction to court procedure, rules of evidence, examination of witnesses, and case development, with the majority of the course devoted to preparing for and engaging in a mock trial. Students will take the role of attorney in the trial simulation, becoming familiar with the U.S. court system and furthering their critical thinking and public speaking skills. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors, with preference given to students pursuing the Legal Studies minor.

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PSCI 338 - Parties and the Elections

Political parties play an integral role in democracy. This course explores the role that political parties play in the United States throughout history. Additionally, we will carefully examine the electoral system of the US and the behavior of the American voter.

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PSCI 340 - Social Science Research Methods

Principles of design, measurement, sampling; the ethical implications of research and evaluation methods. Students are given the opportunity to critique, design or carry out an actual research project.

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PSCI 370 - Criminal Law

Introduction to the substantive and procedural aspects of criminal law. Nature and origins of U.S. criminal law; conditions for criminality and type of crime.

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PSCI 401 - Environmental Law and Policy

An overview of environmental law and related public policy.

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PSCI 455 - American Political Thought

This course explores questions central to political theory. It begins with traditional readings on social contract theory, liberal democracy, speech rights, and Marxism. It then turns to a closer investigation of the relationship between morality and political thought: What role should the modern state play in people's lives? Some of the specific issues explored in this portion of the course will be racial profiling, drug legalization, pollution control, and school vouchers.

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PSYC 102 - Drugs and Society

This course provides an introduction to the basic physiological, psychological, and behavioral effects of the major drugs of use and abuse: stimulants, depressants, inhalants, psychoactive medications, alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, over-the-counter drugs, opiods, hallucinogens, marijuana, and performance-enhancing drugs. The course will also explore the following issues related to drugs and society: addiction and factors that affect it, prevention of drug abuse, treatment of drug abuse, and policy related to drug use and availability.

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PSYC 110 - Introduction to Psychology

This course is an introduction to fundamental psychological concepts which are derived from applying the scientific method to the study of behavior. Examples of selected topics include: personality development, abnormal behavior and therapy, physiology, motivation and emotions, human development, learning and memory, and social behavior. This course emphasizes theories and theorists as well as relevant applications to everyday living. An introduction to APA style of writing is included.

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PSYC 205 - Introduction to Forensic Psychology

This course will provide students with an overview of the interface between psychology and the legal system. Students will learn about how legal issues and psychological issues weigh in the process of the criminal justice system. Topics under discussion will include the death penalty and the insanity defense, criminal investigation, eyewitness testimony, and how to ensure the most accurate police line-ups. Other topics will include areas such as suspect interrogations and false confessions, the validity of polygraphs, the veracity of child eyewitness accounts, and how to accurately interview young children.

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PSYC 275 - Individualized Special Topics Study

Guided reading or research on special topics for individualized or group study. Examples could include clinical, Industrial/Organizational, School Psychology, Art Therapy, Sport Psychology, Psychometrics, Child/Family Counseling, Giftedness/Special Needs, Applied Behavioral Analysis and Sensation/Perception. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor With departmental approval

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PSYC 280 - Developmental Psychology

This course focuses on the development of an individual from conception to death. Psychological/physiological growth is studied in terms of cognitive, psychosocial, moral, psychosexual, and thanotological developmental stage theories. A minimum of one behavioral observation and a journal research report written in APA style will be required. Prerequisite: PSYC 110 • Fall, Spring

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PSYC 295 - Experimental Psychology

Emphasizes the study of experimental methodology, research design, and analysis of research data using SPSS. The laboratory sessions provide practical experience in conducting research and learning to communicate research results. Prerequisite: PSYC 110 and MATH 200. (Instructor permission required)

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PSYC 310 - Social Psychology

A comprehensive overview of the field of social psychology which examines the impact of other individuals, groups or social stimuli on individual thinking and behavior. The social influence process is studied through topics such as self-theory, attribution, social cognition, attitudes, aggression, pro-social behavior, attraction and groups. (See SOCY 310.) Prerequisite: PSYC 110

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PSYC 320 - Psychological Assessment

PSYC 325 - Introduction to Interviewing and Counseling

The course focuses on the development of skills essential to effective professional counseling. Emphasis is on conducting the overall clinical interview, as well as conducting intake interviews, mental status evaluations, a bio-psychosocial history, a mental health history, and a psychological assessment for treatment planning. Finally, students will learn a variety of counseling theories and how techniques from these theories will help guide case formulation and treatment. As part of this course, students will have the opportunity to take part in two mock therapy sessions that will enable them to put their skills to use. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

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PSYC 350 - Child Psychology

A study of the intellectual, socioemotional, educational, and physiological development of the child from conception to adolescence including the impact of environmental/hereditary factors. Emphasis is placed on theory and research with primary focus on the developmental theories of Piaget (Cognitive), Erikson (Psychosocial), Kohlberg (Moral), and Freud (Psychoanalytic). A formal classroom presentation and an APA-style paper on current research in child psychology are required. Prerequisite: PSYC 110 and 280

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PSYC 351 - Psychology of Adolescence

Study of physiological, psychological, cognitive, and social/moral development of adolescents. Middle School education, guidance, and implications for multicultural diversity will be emphasized. A formal classroom presentation and an APA-style presentation on current issues in adolescence are required. Prerequisite: PSYC 110 and 280

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PSYC 352 - Psychopharmacology

An introduction to psychoactive therapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse. The biochemical, physiological, and behavioral effects of each will be considered. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

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PSYC 355 - Adulthood and Aging

This course provides a foundation for understanding psychological development of older people with focus on geriatric assessment and psychological disorders in the aging population. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

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PSYC 360 - Abnormal Psychology

A study of the classification of variant behavior and hypotheses used to explain such behavior. The symptoms, dynamics, treatment, and prognosis of various behavior syndromes will also be considered. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

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PSYC 365 - Human Motivation and Emotion

This course will examine the human principles of motivation and emotion. Special emphasis is given to the influence motivation and emotion principles have on the human learning process. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

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PSYC 375 - Individualized Special Topics Study II

Guided reading or research on special topics for individualized or group study. Examples could include clinical, Industrial/Organizational, School Psychology, Art Therapy, Sport Psychology, Psychometrics, Child/Family Counseling, Giftedness/Special Needs, Applied Behavioral Analysis and Sensation/Perception. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor With departmental approval

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PSYC 380 - Theories of Personality

An advanced level course designed to present, in detail, several theoretical perspectives on the nature of human personality. Included are the Freudian, neo-Freudian, behavioral, cognitive and humanistic-existential models. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

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PSYC 390 - Psychology Internship

Field internships are available at community agencies, medical and mental facilities, special or early childhood education settings, businesses/industry or national placements such as Washington or Chicago and international such as Greece, England or Sweden. Internships are cooperative endeavors among a psychology faculty member/advisor, the psychology student and a community supervisor. Students should begin the process of creating an internship at least 10 weeks (one term) prior to beginning the internship. Students may propose a tentative internship location and learning experience to their psychology advisor or discuss with an advisor various possibilities for an internship. The minimum number of participation hours for a 10-week term for three credits is 150 hours (50 hours per credit). Upon completion of this internship, development of an experiential portfolio and an oral presentation based on an internship project to be shared with an identified campus group/class are required. Additional requirements depend upon advisor and community supervisor. Prerequisite: Permission of the psychology department chairperson With departmental approval

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PSYC 400 - Learning and Memory

The study of the principles of conditioning, learning, and memory in animals and humans. Special emphasis on theoretical foundations and practical applications. Traditional and current theoretical perspectives are evaluated in the light of empirical research evidence. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

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PSYC 405 - Criminal Forensic Psychology

This course provides an introduction to psychological issues related to understanding, assessing, and managing both sexual and violent behaviors. An overview of mental health disorders and their relationship to both types of criminality will be provided. Topics include, but will not be limited to, insanity, psychopathy, serial killing, stalking, women who kill and sexually offend, and treatment strategies aimed at reducing both sexual and physical violence. Finally, the course will focus on methods of assessment currently used to help predict the risk of both sexual and violent re-offending. Prerequisite:PSYC 110, PSYC 205, PSYC 360

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PSYC 415 - Cognitive Psychology

This course covers the advent of the cognitive revolution, the components of the human information processing system (i.e. detection, attention, pattern recognition and memory), and higher cognitive processes like language and problem solving. Historical and current theories examined in the light of empirical evidence and the usefulness of this perspective will be illustrated in pragmatic areas. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

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PSYC 455 - Applied Behavior Analysis

Applied behavior analysis is a lecture/seminar-based course that introduces the basic concepts of behavior analysis and how they are applied to real world problems. We will discuss a broad range of topics, including: analyzing and evaluating behavior change, reinforcement, shaping, punishment, extinction, stimulus control, generalization and classical conditioning. Prerequisite: PSYC 110

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PSYC 460 - History and Systems

This course studies the historical contributions of modern psychology. The focus is on the philosophical and biological roots of current theoretical and empirical systems. Consideration is given to the major schools of thought in psychology and their influence on contemporary work in the field. Special emphasis is given to key influential persons who contributed to the early development of the distinct field of psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 110. (Instructor permission required)

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PSYC 465 - Senior Seminar

A capstone research experience where the student will select a research idea, conduct a literature review on the topic, propose a study, conduct the study, and then present data in both oral and written form. Prerequisite: PSYC 110, PSYC 295

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PSYC 475 - Individualized Special Topics Study III

Guided reading or research on special topics for individualized or group study. Examples could include clinical, Industrial/Organizational, School Psychology, Art Therapy, Sport Psychology, Psychometrics, Child/Family Counseling, Giftedness/Special Needs, Applied Behavioral Analysis and Sensation/Perception. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor With departmental approval

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PSYC 490 - Psychology Internship II

Field internships are available at community agencies, medical and mental facilities, special or early childhood education settings, businesses/industry or national placements such as Washington or Chicago and international such as Greece, England or Sweden. Internships are cooperative endeavors among a psychology faculty member/advisor, the psychology student and a community supervisor. Students should begin the process of creating an internship at least 10 weeks (one term) prior to beginning the internship. Students may propose a tentative internship location and learning experience to their psychology advisor or discuss with an advisor various possibilities for an internship. The minimum number of participation hours for a 10-week term for three credits is 150 hours (50 hours per credit). Upon completion of this internship, development of an experiential portfolio and an oral presentation based on an internship project to be shared with an identified campus group/class are required. Additional requirements depend upon advisor and community supervisor. Prerequisite: Permission of the psychology department chairperson With departmental approval

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PSYC 500 - Behavior Principles

This course will examine the history and theory of the psychology of learning. This course will focus on classical conditioning as well as the behavior analytic approach to studying reinforcement, punishment, avoidance, stimulus control, and choice behavior.

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PSYC 510 - Applied Behavior Analysis

This course will consider the application of basic research in behavior analysis to problems of social significance. The core elements of behavioral principles, processes, and procedures of behavior change as well as specific procedures for inducing behavior change will be emphasized.

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PSYC 520 - Ethical and Professional Conduct in Behavior Analysis

This course will consider the ethical standards for psychologists (APA) as applied to research and clinical problems. The focus will be on examples relevant to the practice of behavior analysis.

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PSYC 575 - Advanced Topics in Behavior Analysis I

In this first of a two-series course, students will explore advanced topics in one of three broad areas of behavior analysis: applied, basic, or conceptual.

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PSYC 590 - Graduate Practicum

Students will participate in a supervised practicum experience (1000 hours) working with individuals with autism. This experience will last throughout the certificate program, with credit hours similarly distributed across the program duration. Students will be supervised by a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.

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PSYC 600 - Single-Case Design

This course will evaluate single subject designs in both basic and applied research as well as how these designs can be used to evaluate behavior change in intervention programs. Areas of emphasis include methodology, data analysis, historical and conceptual bases, and its role in behavioral psychology.

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PSYC 610 - Functional Behavior Assessment

This course will examine how behavior analysts assess behavior and select appropriate intervention outcomes and strategies. The course focuses on training individuals to recognize the functional relation between behavior and the antecedent events and consequences that surround it. Students will learn how to conduct functional behavior assessments, how to analyze the data obtained from such assessments, and then be able to make specific behavioral and environmental recommendations based on the assessments.

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PSYC 620 - Behavior Intervention & Planning

This course will expand on the content discussed in Applied Behavior Analysis and Functional Behavior Assessment by focusing on the planning and implementation of behavior change procedures. Design and communication of behavior intervention plans will be the primary focus of the course. Additional topics of special concern will include systems of maintaining behavior, supervision and monitoring of plan implementation, and analysis of behavior change agents both within and outside of a clinic setting.

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PSYC 675 - Advanced Topics in Behavior Analysis II

In this second of a two-series course, students will explore advanced topics in one of three broad areas of behavior analysis: applied, basic, or conceptual.

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SOCY 124 - Principles of Sociology

Introduction to the field of sociology and its theories, concepts and research methods. Main topics are culture, the family, socialization, deviance, social stratification, race relations, gender, and economic and political globalization.

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SOCY 228 - Contemporary Global Problems

A survey of the positive and negative outcomes of globalization, including increased economic interdependence, growing inequalities in income and wealth, urbanization and migration patterns, population and health issues, religious and ethnic tolerance, and war.

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SOCY 235 - Sociology of Marriages and Families

Study of the family as a basic institution of society with emphasis on its internal structure and dynamics, its functions for the individual and society, and its relationship to other social institutions.

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SOCY 240 - Racial, Ethnic and Gender Inequality

Analysis of the interaction of minorities with dominant populations; explanations of how minorities are created and maintained; characteristics of racial, ethnic and gender relations in the United States and other societies.

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SOCY 319 - Social Movements

An exploration of social movements and their importance as a means toward social change, including grassroots resistance, community organizing, political conflicts, and revolutions. Examination of major sociological theories used in the study of social movements. Specific movements to be covered include the women's suffrage movement, the Prohibition era, the Civil Rights era, and the environment movement. Offered even years.

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SOCY 320 - Restorative Justice

Introduction to innovations and alternatives in the traditional criminal justice system with an emphasis on negotiation, mediation, and reparation in dispute resolution; emphasis on non- violence and peacemaking in the Franciscan tradition.

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SOCY 340 - Social Science Research Methods

Principles of problem formulation, design, measurement, sampling, data collection and analysis; ethical considerations for research on human subjects. Students are given the opportunity to design or carry out a research project. Prerequisite: SOCY 124 or instructor's consent

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SPAN 475 - Independent Study

Open to students who wish to engage in directed research in a selected area of study. The ability to study independently, keeping with deadlines and good organizational skills are required. With departmental approval

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SOCY 341 - Statistical Analysis

A research methods course involving the collection, manipulation, analysis and reporting of social science data using computer software (SPSS). Students will process original or secondary data and prepare reports for public presentation. Prerequisite: SOCY 340 or instructor's consent.

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SPAN 490 - Spanish Internship

An intensive, supervised work experience in a discipline related work environment, where student would use his/her knowledge of Spanish on a daily basis. Site and scheduling must be agreed upon by the student, faculty member and work place. Pass/no-credit grading. Prerequisite: Approval of supervising faculty member

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SOCY 342 - Advanced Research Methods

Further study of survey designs, qualitative field methods, and types of program and policy evaluation including needs assessment, process and outcome evaluation, social impact analysis and cost-benefit analysis. Prerequisite: SOCY 340

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SPAN 498 - Senior Seminar

A capstone course focusing on different topics of Spanish grammar, culture or literature. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status and permission of the instructor

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SOCY 375 - Independent Sociology Study

Open to majors in sociology; directed research in a selected area with an acceptable written or oral presentation of such research. With departmental approval

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SPEC 109 - Human Communication

A general introduction to various contexts of human communication including the dyad, group dynamics, non-verbal, intra-and interpersonal communication.

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SOCY 376 - Sociology of Law

Study of the origin and types of law, ideas of justice and rights; and theories of punishment; comparision of the U.S. legal system and approach to punishment with that of other nations. Offered even years.

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SPEC 110 - Voice and Diction

An introduction to the working of the human voice. Emphasis on development of maximum vocal flexibility, control and growth.

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SOCY 384 - Geographic Information Systems

Introduction to the computer software used to map the geographic distribution of a variety of social and physical variables and social indicators.

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SPEC 111 - Public Speaking

An introduction to the craft of public speaking. Emphasis is placed on techniques of speech composition. A study is made of the different types of speeches with special attention given to informative and persuasive speaking.

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SOCY 420 - Social Stratification

An overview of the American class structure, both historic and current, and its impact on other areas of social life; focus on issues of inequality and social mobility. Offered odd years.

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SPEC 220 - Oral Interpretation

A study of how the voice is used to suggest the variety of meanings inherent in any printed material.

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SOCY 430 - Sociology of Religion

Study of the functions of religion for the individual and for society; variations in belief systems and in the structures of religious organizations; new religious movements.

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SOCY 439 - Sociological Theory

Seminar exploring ideas of social structure and social processes in the work of major classical and contemporary sociological theorists. Offered odd years.

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SOCY 446 - Crime and Deviant Behavior

Descriptive study of major types of crime, delinquency and other forms of deviance using both qualitative and quantitative data; designed to explain nonconformity and the rationales used to justify the control of deviance.

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SOCY 447 - Theories of Deviant Behavior

Explanations of deviance, their historical development and interrelationships; contemporary theories and their empirical validation. Prerequisite: SOCY 446

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SOCY 475 - Independent Sociology Study II

Open to majors in sociology; directed research in a selected area with an acceptable written or oral presentation of such research. With departmental approval

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SPTS 490 - Sports Science Internship

To be arranged. Permission of the department is required

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SOCY 490 - Social Research Internship

An experiential learning opportunity in which advanced students apply theory and method in a practical research setting. Students may initiate their own research projects, do secondary analysis or participate in funded research projects of the Social Science Research Center at Briar Cliff University. Research topics vary, from analysis of crime statistics, census data, and drug use and abuse information to the evaluation of programs for social agencies and governmental bodies. The internship culminates in a senior research presentation. With departmental approval

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SPTS 64 IS - Fitness Testing and Exercise Prescription

Basic skills and understanding are developed in the art and science of fitness testing and exercise prescription. The conducting of individualized fitness programs for all age groups will be examine.

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SOCY 499 - Special Topics

One-credit courses in selected aspects of sociology, e.g., urban sociology, sports, social movements, class structure and terrorism.

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SPTS 65 IS - First Aid and CPR Instructors Course

This course is designed to certify the student as an American Red Cross First Aid and/or CPR Instructor. Current basic certification in first aid and CPR are required.

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SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I

An introduction to the fundamentals of Spanish, including an emphasis on listening comprehension, speaking, grammar and culture. No prior experience with the language is required. It does not apply toward a major or a minor.

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SPTS 70 IS - Cardiovascular Physiology

A study of circulatory physiology and pathophysiology, including the function of cardiac muscle, cardiac control, vascular smooth muscle and common disease processes of the cardiovascular system. One lecture, one lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 222

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SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II

A continuation of SPAN 101. It does not apply towards a major or minor. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or appropriate placement through CLEP

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SPTS 71 IS - Advanced Human Anatomy

Advanced study of the major systems of the body with emphasis on the nervous, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. One lecture, one lab per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 221

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SPAN 205 - Intermediate Spanish

This course reinforces, synthesizes and expands upon the major concepts taught in elementary level Spanish. This course uses pair and group work, learning in context and critical thinking skills to enhance reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension skills. This course is required for the major and minor in Spanish.

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SPAN 301 - Adavanced Grammar and Conversation

An advanced study of grammar nuances, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary in a conversational context. Readings and videos will encourage class discussion. Students will be evaluated based on their oral and written proficiency through class discussions, written and oral reports. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202, four years of high school Spanish, or appropriate placement through CLEP.

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SWRK 130 - Introduction to Social Work

Survey of the field of professional social work with particular emphasis on the role of the social worker in addressing racial and ethnic relations and contemporary social problems. Overview of areas of practice employed in social work. The course will include an on-going exploration of the student's values and interest in working with people.

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SPAN 302 - Advanced Grammar and Composition

A continuation of the grammar principals studied in 301, with additional emphasis on composition. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or permission of the instructor

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SPAN 303 - Spanish for Careers

An advanced course designed to meet the students' needs for special vocabulary and expressions for the different careers. Emphasis will be placed on business, bilingual education, social-work, law enforcement and health care professions. The ability to study independently, keeping with deadlines, and good organizational skills are strongly recommended. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or permission of the instructor

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SWRK 175 - Independent Social Work Study

Student-designed project in a special area. Open to advanced social work students with the permission of the chairperson.

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SPAN 311 - Culture and Civilization of Spain

A study of the culture and civilization of Spain through its history of social, political and religious institutions. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or permission of the instructor. Offered every other spring.

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SPAN 312 - Culture and Civilization of Latin America

A study of the culture and civilization of Latin America through its history of social, political and religious institutions. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or permission of the instructor. Offered every other spring

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SWRK 275 - Study Abroad in Guatemala

This three-week course, offered in January, includes intensive one-on-one Spanish language instruction and service-learning experience with the Asociaciòn Nuestros Ahijados. Students explore cultural, educational, and health and social justice issues.

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SPAN 335 - Introduction to the Study of Literature in Spanish

An introduction to the study of literature from the Spanish-speaking world. Emphasis will be placed on the skills necessary to study literature in a foreign language, including an introduction to the literary genres and vocabulary used to analyze literature in Spanish. Works will be chosen from Spain and Latin America. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or permission of the instructor

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SPAN 411 - Survey of the Literature of Spain

An introduction of the major writers and movements in Peninsular literature. The genres of poetry, drama and narrative will be studied and analyzed. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 335

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SPAN 412 - Survey of the Literature of Latin America

An introduction of the major writers and movements in Latin American Literature. The genres of poetry, drama and narrative will be studied and analyzed. This course is conducted in Spanish. Offered every other spring.

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SPAN 435 - Lights, Camera, Action

An introduction to plays, and films in the Spanish world, this course will facilitate the study of Hispanic culture and language. This course is conducted in Spanish. Recommended: SPAN 335

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SWRK 252 - Corrections

Study of corrections in USA: court system, sentencing, probation, parole and prisons; alternatives to current system including restorative justice. Includes a brief look at juvenile system.

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SPAN 440 - Seminar in Teaching Methodology

This course provides an overview of the theoretical as well as practical foundations, and applications of language instruction approaches, methods, and techniques that are effective in the foreign language classroom in the K-12 school setting. Recent trends and historical approaches to teaching foreign languages, and their applicability will be investigated. The concept of communicative language teaching, and the appropriate connections with other disciplines will be made. Teaching demonstrations, and research critiques based on the learning and teaching principles of the class will be required. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

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SWRK 355 - Child Welfare and the Law

Study of Indian Child Welfare Act, Multiethnic Placement Act, and Adoption and Safe Families Act and the impact of these federal policies on child welfare.

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SPAN 450 - International Experience

An opportunity to study abroad for a minimum of four weeks. This includes a complete immersion into Hispanic language and culture. Arrangements for academic credit, and faculty approval must be made prior to the international experience. Pass/no-credit grading. Maybe taken for no credit, or up to a total of six semester hours. The last course for completion of major or minor must be taken on campus. Recommended: SPAN 201 or its equivalent and departmental approval is required beforehand.

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SWRK 390 - Grant Writing (Honors)

The two-hour grant writing course is open to social work majors and honors students from all disciplines. The course develops practical skills needed for successful grant writing. Twice weekly class sessions provide a theoretical foundation and opportunity for peer review, dynamic consultations with community grant writers, and instructor consultations for the successful development of a competitive grant proposal.

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SWRK 443 - Field Work

Field placement in a local agency (450 hrs.) with professional supervision supplemented by conferences, collateral readings, written evaluation and an on-campus weekly seminar. Monday - Thursday Permission of Director of Field Education required for agency field placement. Prerequisite: all required social work courses except SWRK 380

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SWRK 475 - Independent Social Work Study II

Student-designed project in a special area. Open to advanced social work students with the permission of the chairperson.

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THEO 115 - Foundations of Christianity

This course will explore the essentials of Christian faith and practice, particularly as they are expressed in Roman Catholic Christianity. Students will be invited to reflect on the meaning of faith, the relevance of the message and mission of Jesus Christ for the contemporary world, and the role of personal spirituality in everyday life. Offered in spring for honors students.

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THEO 116 - Church in the World

This course will explore the history of the Christian church beginning with the foundations described in the Gospels and the Book of Acts. Students will learn about the crises, personalities, and cultural contexts that shaped the Christian Church in ages past and brought about the current state of denominational plurality and doctrinal differences. Since THEO 203 - Protestant Churches considers the development of the Protestant Churches after the Reformation, this course gives special attention to the past few centuries of the Roman Catholic Church. Additionally, students will learn about the various ecumenical dialogues that have begun in the last several decades in an attempt to restore some of the unity of the early Christian Church. Spring offering for honors students

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THEO 195 - Theology of Harry Potter

Students learn about and reflect on the presence of theological themes and parallels in contemporary culture. The course will focus on and analyze the underlying theological issues of the Harry Potter series and evaluate whether or not it is responsible to draw parallels between modern cultural expression and major theological themes that have been borrowed and incorporated into western cultures. The course explores the central problem of how theology is to be undertaken in different cultural settings.

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THEO 203 - Protestant Churches

The multiplicity of Christian denominations is a phenomenon of modern times. In this course, students will study both the history of the major families of Christian denominations and the doctrinal, ecclesial and liturgical differences among those denominations. Students will also investigate current ecumenical movements that seek to reduce divisions among Christians.

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THEO 204 - Christian Morality

The Christian life is a response to God's saving act and the life and teachings of Jesus Christ. This course investigates the basic concepts and approaches to moral decision making and considers selected questions and issues that pose moral dilemmas in contemporary society. Spring offering for honors students.

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THEO 223 - Old Testament

This course is a study of the formation and composition of the Old Testament as an inspired record of the progressive revelation by God to Israel and the faith response of God's people, as well as preparation for the revelation of/in Christ. There is a special emphasis on basic theological themes and their applications to the lives of the people of God today.

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THEO 224 - New Testament

A study of the formation and composition of the New Testament, and a survey reading of the New Testament literature exemplifying essential messages and themes and their implications for the lives of Christians today.

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SWRK 01 IS - Introduction to Field Work

Orientation to field work including a beginning understanding of the community social service network, visiting selected agencies, becoming familiar with agency expectations, interviewing and finalizing field placement. Prerequisite: SWRK 230, 320, 370, and 370L

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THEO 245 - Catholic Social Teachings

The social teachings of the Roman Catholic Church promote the dignity of the human person and the centrality of the family for authentic human existence. Students will engage the major social teaching documents of the church in order to notice both the development of that teaching in the 19th and 20th centuries and the continuity of that teaching with the Gospels and with the Christian tradition. Students will also consider how those teachings, as well as other important human rights documents provide the necessary foundation for the work for justice in the world. Offered odd years.

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THEO 255 - Christian Spirituality and Prayer

If theology is "faith seeking understanding," as St. Anselm has said, one cannot "do" theology without also having a significant faith life. Hence, this course has both an academic and a developmental focus. Students will read the great spiritual masters who have shaped Christian spirituality as they learn about the various Christian traditions and practices of prayer. During the course of the semester, students will be invited to reflect on their own spirituality and to consider how it shapes both their theological studies and their Christian praxis. Offered even years.

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SWRK 14 IS - Community Organization

This required senior IS presents theories and concepts essential to understanding community organization as a social work practice intertwined with practical experiential learning with community professionals. Includes study of history of organizing in the U.S. and examination of strategies and skills used in working with communities and organizations to promote self- determination, self-sufficiency, empowerment and social justice.

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THEO 260 - Francis, Clare and Franciscan Spirituality

This course introduces students to the writings of the great spiritual masters of the Franciscan movement. Readings will be drawn from those of Francis and Clare, from the great medieval writers such as Bonaventure, and from contemporary Franciscan writers. Students will also investigate the influence Franciscan spirituality has had on the Church as a whole, especially as it has been lived out by the various Franciscan religious congregations and by the Third Order Secular Franciscans. Offered even years.

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THEO 270 - Mission and Discipleship

Students learn about and reflect on mission and discipleship in preparation for participation in a mission trip sponsored by Campus Ministry. After the trip, students continue their reflection on mission and discipleship in light of their own experiences.

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SWRK 230 - History and General Method of Social Work

History of social work and introduction to the general method of social work with emphasis on diversity and populations-at-risk. Directed volunteer experience in one agency (three to four hours a week). This is the first required course in the social work sequence.

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THEO 285 - Special Topics in Scripture

Students will explore a particular biblical topic in greater detail, using primary exegetical sources (e.g. Patristic and Medieval writings, church documents, contemporary treatises) as well as comprehensive secondary sources that provide helpful analyses of the topic and its associated issues. The particular topic will be chosen in consultation with students and will address areas of specialization that students wish to pursue.

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THEO 295 - Special Topics in Theology

Students will explore a particular theological topic in greater detail, using primary sources (e.g. Scripture, Patristic and Medieval writings, church documents, contemporary theological treatises) as well as comprehensive secondary sources that provide helpful analyses of the topic and its associated issues. The particular topic will be chosen in consultation with students and will address areas of specialization that students wish to pursue. Prerequisite: at least one 100 or 200 level THEO course, or consent of instructor.

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THEO 310 - Ministry

This course introduces students to both the theoretical and the practical aspects of ministry. Students will be invited to reflect on the shape of their own call to ministry, whether it be as spouse and parent, lay person in the church, ordained minister, or consecrated religious, as they participate in service learning projects that allow them to experience doing ministry first-hand. Prerequisite: at least one 100 or 200 level THEO course, or consent of instructor.

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SWRK 320 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment

The course provides content about theories and knowledge of human biological, psychological and social development, and about the range of social systems in which individuals live (families, groups, organizations, institutions and communities). Content includes examining the impact of social and economic forces on individuals and social systems as well as values and ethical issues related to bio-pyscho-social theories. Human diversity issues are infused throughout the course Prerequisite:SOCY 124, BIOL 102/BIOL 111, SWRK 230, PSYC 110 and 280

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THEO 325 - Liturgy and Sacrament

Sacrament and liturgy are central elements of the Christian encounter with and response to God's gift of salvation through the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. This course uses an historical approach to the development of the Christian ways of worship, placing that development within the theological concepts of sacrament and ritual as the Roman Catholic Church understands them. Prerequisite: at least one 100 or 200 level THEO course, or consent of instructor.

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SWRK 325 - Mental Health and Mental Illness

This course will familiarize students with the most common mental health disorders and explore the prevalence of mental health realities in the social work field. This course will acquaint students with mental health resources and issues including legislative advocacy.

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THEO 345 - Ecclesiology

The course will introduce the student to the theology of church through the writings of patristic, medieval and contemporary theologians, through study of the documents of the Second Vatican Council, and through a comparison of Protestant and Catholic understandings of what it is to be church. Prerequisite: at least one 100 or 200 level THEO course, or consent of instructor.

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SWRK 345 - Child Welfare

General philosophies, goals and functions of the field of child welfare practice; in-depth analysis of specific child welfare service programs in the context of the overall social service delivery system.

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THEO 361 - Pentateuch

The Pentateuch or Torah, the first five books of the Bible, is foundational to Jewish and Christian understandings of God's covenantal relationship with humans and creation. Informed by ancient and modern religious thought, students will engage with the stories and religious practices of the ancient Hebrews, investigate their connections to Ancient Near Eastern literary and material (archaeological) cultures, and consider the impact of the Pentateuch on the theology and practices of Judaism and Christianity, exploring theological themes of creation, sin, covenant, purity, liturgy, and community. Prerequisite: THEO 223, or consent of instructor.

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THEO 362 - Prophets

The Latter Prophets of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament are records of revelation given to individual prophets over the course of at least five hundred years, from Isaiah through Malachi. Investigation of the prophets' cultural context and use of poetic communication will inform careful analysis of the prophets' messages of salvation and calls for social justice. Prerequisite: THEO 223 - Old Testament, or consent of instructor.

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SWRK 360 - Social Issues and Policy

Analysis of current social policy at all levels within the context of historical and contemporary factors and principles of social and economic justice. Includes the study of political and organizational processes used to influence and formulate policy and the delivery of social services. Prerequisite:SWRK 230

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THEO 363 - Gospels

The Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) offer striking portraits of Jesus' vocation and saving death, providing insight into Jesus' ministry to the marginal and the implications of Jesus' parables and calls for transformation in view of the coming of the kingdom of God. The Gospel of John adds depth to the portrait of Jesus as divine, making claims that are the basis for Christian understandings of the Trinity. A critical treatment of the historical context and literary genres of the Gospels will inform careful exegesis, including comparison and contrast of the sources and extra-biblical texts and material culture. Prerequisite: THEO 224, or consent of instructor.

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SWRK 370 - Social Work Practice I

The course will direct the student in the use of the general method of social work practice as a framework for practice with client systems of varied sizes. Emphasis will be placed on individuals interacting with other systems in their environment. The course and lab include practice of interviewing skills. Prerequisite: SWRK 230 and 320

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THEO 364 - Paul

Paul, "the apostle to the Gentiles," left us a plethora of letters, providing stimulus for Christianity's mission to diverse cultures and providing foundational theological principles that have kindled rich theological inquiry and discussion. An evaluation of Paul's life, including his pre-Christian years and his extensive travels, and an examination of the recipients' cultural background and communal concerns will provide the foundation for careful exegesis of the Pauline letters. Prerequisite: THEO 224, or consent of instructor.

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SWRK 370L - Social Work Practice I Lab

This required lab is offered concurrently with Practice I. Students practice interviewing skills with supervision and feedback essential for integration of the knowledge foundation developed in SWRK 370. Concurrent with SWRK 370

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THEO 368 - Biblical Hebrew

Classical Hebrew is the primary language of the Hebrew Bible, a form of Hebrew that provides a basis for later Rabbinic and Modern Hebrew. This introduction delves into the basics of the language, including the verbal stems, nouns, particles, and sentence formation. The primary texts and vocabulary are taken from the Bible, supplemented by discussion of the Bible's origins and shifts in Classical Hebrew. Prerequisite: THEO 223, or consent of instructor.

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SWRK 375 - Social Work Practice II

Within the framework of the general method of social work and interacting with other systems, particular attention is focused on mezzo practice and theory. The class itself is a group lab experience. Prerequisite: SWRK 230, 320, 370, and 370L

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THEO 369 - New Testament Greek

All the books of the New Testament were written in Koine (Common) Greek, a descendant of Classical Greek and the lingua franca for much of the Mediterranean during the Roman Empire. As an introduction to Koine Greek, this course provides a methodological treatment of the basics of the language: nouns, verbs, adjectives, particles, and sentence formation. With added attention to the formation of the New Testament, primary attention is given to New Testament vocabulary and texts, making this a good basis for careful study of the New Testament. Prerequisite: THEO 224, or consent of instructor.

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SWRK 381 - Social Work Practice III (Part 1)

The general method of social work practice is applied to working with community and organizations as these interact with smaller systems.

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THEO 385 - Special Topics in Scripture II

Students will explore a particular biblical topic in greater detail, using primary exegetical sources (e.g. Patristic and Medieval writings, church documents, contemporary treatises) as well as comprehensive secondary sources that provide helpful analyses of the topic and its associated issues. The particular topic will be chosen in consultation with students and will address areas of specialization that students wish to pursue.

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THEO 395 - Special Topics in Theology II

Students will explore a particular theological topic in greater detail, using primary sources (e.g. Scripture, Patristic and Medieval writings, church documents, contemporary theological treatises) as well as comprehensive secondary sources that provide helpful analyses of the topic and its associated issues. The particular topic will be chosen in consultation with students and will address areas of specialization that students wish to pursue. Prerequisite: at least one 100 or 200 level THEO course, or consent of instructor.

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THEO 405 - Christology

This course introduces the student to the ways that Christians have expressed their belief that God has accomplished our redemption through the life, death and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth, whom Christians call the Christ. Beginning with the primary source for our knowledge about Jesus, the New Testament, especially the Gospels, students will learn about the person of Jesus, the doctrines of Incarnation and Trinity, and the various ways that Christians have attempted to explain Jesus' work of salvation through the centuries. Prerequisite: THEO 115 or THEO 116, and THEO 224, or consent of instructor. Offered even years in spring.

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SWRK 444 - Field Work Seminar

Required seminar for all students in SWRK 443 Field Work. Prerequisite: All required social work courses except SWRK 380.

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THEO 445 - Christian Anthropology

Using an historical approach, students will study the Christian understanding of the human person as created in God's image. Students will read primary sources in order to discover the ways that Christian thinkers in every era of Christianity have understood the origins, nature and destiny of the human person. While the emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition, readings will include authors from other Christian traditions as well as authors writing from such theological perspectives as feminist theology and liberation theology. Prerequisite: at least one 100 or 200 level THEO course, or consent of instructor.

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SWRK 465 - Gerontology

Focuses on the multiple social aspects of aging: gender, sexuality, isolation and loneliness, roles, employment and retirement, dying, death and bereavement, living environments, political aspects, legal aspects, community resources and supports, critical issues in aging, social service delivery systems, social inequalities, cultural aspects and ethical considerations.

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THEO 450 - God: Father, Son and Holy Spirit

The Christian understanding of God as Trinity is one of the more complex doctrines of Christianity. In this course, students will follow the discussions of the early Councils, read such medieval greats as Thomas Aquinas, and engage with the contemporary theological conversation about God who is Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Prerequisite: at least one 100 or 200 level THEO course, or consent of instructor.

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THEO 480 - Biblical Theology

The bible is the foundational source for Christian theology. This course explores such ideas as discipleship, salvation, and social justice as they are presented in the various sections of Scripture. It is a course that will allow students to put into practice the exegetical and interpretive skills they have developed in previous scripture courses. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a Theology major in the Biblical Theology track, or senior standing as a Theology major/minor with one of the following courses: THEO 361, 362, 363, 364.

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THEO 485 - Special Topics in Scripture III

Students will explore a particular biblical topic in greater detail, using primary exegetical sources (e.g. Patristic and Medieval writings, church documents, contemporary treatises) as well as comprehensive secondary sources that provide helpful analyses of the topic and its associated issues. The particular topic will be chosen in consultation with students and will address areas of specialization that students wish to pursue. Prerequisite: THEO 223 or THEO 224, or consent of instructor.

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THEO 491 - Senior Seminar

Students will write a thesis that focuses on a particular area of interest to the student. The process of selecting a topic, constructing a bibliography and a thesis statement, writing the paper and presenting the project to a wider audience will be directed by the faculty. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a Theology major in the Theological Foundations track, Theology Teacher track, or Theological Studies track, or senior standing as a Theology minor.

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THEO 495 - Special Topics in Theology III

Students will explore a particular theological topic in greater detail, using primary sources (e.g. Scripture, Patristic and Medieval writings, church documents, contemporary theological treatises) as well as comprehensive secondary sources that provide helpful analyses of the topic and its associated issues. The particular topic will be chosen in consultation with students and will address areas of specialization that students wish to pursue. Prerequisite: at least one 100 or 200 level THEO course, or consent of instructor.

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THTR 037M - Costume Construction

One hour course in theatre professionalism. Theatre majors are required to take three, one-hour courses during the student's first two years in the program. student's first two years in the program.

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THTR 038M - Acting Performance

Performance and technical opportunities are offered to all students by the theatre department. A theatre major is required to take three total credit hours between 038M and 039M. Participation in performance is determined by audition and by being cast in a mainstage production.

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THTR 039M - Technical Production

Performance and technical opportunities are offered to all students by the theatre department. A theatre major is required to take three total credit hours between 038M and 039M. Participation in performance is determined by audition and by being cast in a mainstage production.

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THTR 101 - Introduction to Theatre

A study of all the elements of the theatre: history, acting, directing, design and production. The course is designed as a basis for intelligent theatre going. Consists of lectures, selected readings, a project and play attendance.

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THTR 105 - Stage Technology

A practical study of the basic practices and principles of scenery construction, lighting and prop development. Course offered according to demand.

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THTR 10M - Audition Techniques

One hour course in theatre professionalism. Theatre majors are required to take three, one-hour courses during the student's first two years in the program. student's first two years in the program.

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THTR 121 - Acting I

A study of the fundamental principles and techniques of acting.

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THTR 122 - Acting II

Further scene study and technique development. Prerequisite:THTR 121

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THTR 123 - Acting III

Scene study and technique development. Prerequisite: THTR 121, 122 or instructor's consent. Course offered according to demand.

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THTR 12M - Stage Management

One hour course in theatre professionalism. Theatre majors are required to take three, one-hour courses during the student's first two years in the program. student's first two years in the program.

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THTR 13M - Scenic Painting

One hour course in theatre professionalism. Theatre majors are required to take three, one-hour courses during the student's first two years in the program. student's first two years in the program.

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THTR 14M - Stage Properties

One hour course in theatre professionalism. Theatre majors are required to take three, one-hour courses during the student's first two years in the program. student's first two years in the program.

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THTR 15M - Make-up, Wigs, Millinery

One hour course in theatre professionalism. Theatre majors are required to take three, one-hour courses during the student's first two years in the program. student's first two years in the program.

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THTR 175 - Independent Theatre Study

Open to students who wish to engage in directed research in a selected area. Areas may include an advanced acting or directing project or directed play reading. With departmental approval

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THTR 17M - Stage Electronics

One hour course in theatre professionalism. Theatre majors are required to take three, one-hour courses during the student's first two years in the program. student's first two years in the program.

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THTR 200 - Professional Careers and Management

This course will provide students with an awareness of how professional careers in Acting, Directing, Design, Education, and Management develop in the real world. The course will also examine the different management strategies that are employed by a variety for professional theatre companies in an attempt to provide students with a better awareness of how successful institutions function.

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THTR 205 - NYC Theatre and Art

This course will provide an overview of the cultural offerings of New York City. The primary purpose of the course is to provide students with first-hand knowledge of how major arts organizations function and what career opportunities they provide.

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THTR 21M - Theatre Outreach

One hour course in theatre professionalism. Theatre majors are required to take three, one-hour courses during the student's first two years in the program. student's first two years in the program.

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THTR 226 - Play Analysis

A study of the play structure, genre and script examination for use in theatrical productions.

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THTR 230 - Theatre Design I

An introduction to the three primary design areas in the theatre: scenery, costumes and lighting. The course will focus on issues common to all three areas such as, composition, color theory, semiotics, collaboration and play analysis for design.

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THTR 335 - Directing I

A course designed to give practical experience to various aspects of play production: selection of plays, casting, blocking, rehearsing and management. A short one-act will be presented for public performance. Prerequisite: THTR 121 and 226

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THTR 350 - World Theatre History I

A survey examining theatre forms, contexts and contents from the Golden Age of Greece to the Elizabethan Age. Prerequisite: WRTG 109 or equivalent

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THTR 351 - World Theatre History II

A survey examining theatre forms, contexts and contents from the Elizabethan Age to the present. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent

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THTR 361 - Midwestern Theatre

Special topic in theatre history. Permission of instructor required. Offered Spring, 2013.

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THTR 362 - American Theatre History

Special topic in theatre history. Permission of instructor required. Class offered on demand basis

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THTR 363 - African American Theatre

Special topic in theatre history. Permission of instructor required. Offered Spring 2013

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THTR 365 - Asian Theatre

Special topic in theatre history. Permission of instructor required. Class offered on demand basis.

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THTR 366 - Yiddish Theatre

Special topic in theatre history. Permission of instructor required. Class offered on demand basis.

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THTR 367 - Latin American Theatre

Special topic in theatre history. Permission of instructor required. Class offered on demand basis.

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THTR 368 - Theatre of the Islamic World

This course will explore the enormous variety of theatrical performances that have developed throughout the breadth of the Islamic world. We will look at theatrical traditions from North Africa, the Middle East, Iran, India, Southeast Asia, and South America. As a foundation for the course, we will include readings that provide a solid background on the cultural, religious, and historical contexts for each of these regions. A wide variety of plays, from the medieval era to the present will form the core of the course.

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THTR 435 - Directing II

A continuation of Directing I, but includes a full-length one-act for public performance. Class offered on demand basis. Prerequisite: THTR 335

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THTR 475 - Independent Theatre Study II

Open to students who wish to engage in directed research in a selected area. Areas may include an advanced acting or directing project or directed play reading. With departmental approval

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THTR 495 - Senior Project or Internship

A production under faculty supervision which gives the student an opportunity to design or direct or a course in which advanced students use theory and practice in an off-campus internship. With departmental approval

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WRTG 100 - College Preparatory Writing

This course prepares students for introductory college writing by improving their understanding of grammar and punctuation, and the main characteristics of the writing process: pre-writing, planning, drafting, revising, and proofreading.

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WRTG 109 - Introduction to College Writing

Practice in essay planning, writing and revision; understanding of expository modes; and reconciliation with a personal sense of language. Prerequisite: WRTG 100

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WRTG 128 - Introduction to Creative Writing

Introduction to creative writing in a variety of literary genres. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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WRTG 159 - Contemporary Argument and Research

Current issues will be researched and discussed along with logic, analysis, persuasion and research methods. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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WRTG 175 - Independent Writing Study

By arrangement with instructor only. Students will undertake extensive guided research or writing projects. With departmental approval

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WRTG 19 IS - Advanced Briar Cliff Review

Upper-level students will read and evaluate manuscripts for a nationally-acclaimed literary magazine.

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WRTG 225 - Organizational Communications

WRTG 225 Organizational Communications 3 sem. hrs. Practice and presentation of letters, reports, short speeches and other areas of functional communication. Not open to first-year students. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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WRTG 275 - Independent Writing Study II

By arrangement with instructor only. Students will undertake extensive guided research or writing projects. With departmental approval

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WRTG 315 - Writing for the Web

Writing for the Web studies how basic writing strategies can be adapted to different sorts of online environments, from business and organizational websites to online event promotions, as well as how to integrate typographic and graphic content for maximum effectiveness.

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WRTG 325 - Technical Writing

Introduction to technical writing of manuals, grants, proposals, and software documentation; practice in technical writing and editing, project design and layout, team collaboration, and communication across cultural context. Prerequisite: WRTG 225 or permission of instructor; not open to first-year students. Class available on request

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WRTG 328 - Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry

Using the workshop approach, student writing becomes the text. The instructor is open to suggestions for assignments and other course content. Prerequisite:WRTG 128

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WRTG 329 - Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction

Using the workshop approach, student writing becomes the text. The instructor is open to suggestions for assignments and other course content.

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WRTG 335 - Introduction to Linguistics

Students will explore the nature of language, the origins and evolution of language, the history of the Indo-European languages, including English, the varieties of language as expressions of culture, the acquisition of language by children, language and gender, language and ethnicity, bilingualism, and other topics. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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WRTG 336 - Modern Grammar

The course will focus on the analysis of and structure of sentences from the perspective both of traditional grammar and of transformation/generative grammar. Prerequisite:WRTG 109 or equivalent skill

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WRTG 375 - Independent Writing Study III

By arrangement with instructor only. Students will undertake extensive guided research or writing projects. With departmental approval

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WRTG 390 - Writing Internship

To be arranged. With departmental approval

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WRTG 475 - Independent Writing Study IV

By arrangement with instructor only. Students will undertake extensive guided research or writing projects. With departmental approval

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WRTG 490 - Writing Internship II

To be arranged. With departmental approval

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BUAD 653 - Quantitative Methods

This course introduces the graduate student to basic methods of empirical inquiry in the social sciences.

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BUAD 625 - Business Communications

Application of principles of communication to the managerial setting. The course investigates the influence of organizational climate, manager’s style and use of motivation on the communication process.

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SWRK 382 - Social Work Practice III (Part 2)

Online students apply the general method of social work practice to work with an organization as it interacts with smaller systems.

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SWRK 445 - Field Work

Field placement in a local agency with professional supervision supplemented by weekly scheduled online conferences, collateral readings, and written evaluations during a 450-hour internship.

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THEO 107 - Christian and Franciscan Traditions

A comprehensive historical and theological exploration of Christianity, spanning from its origins into the contemporary age (1st–21st centuries CE).

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MRKT 375 - Seminar in Social Media Issues

Discover the latest trends and explore the possibilities that social media has opened in today's business world.

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